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I sell a good many 8" colonial taper pairs. I could sell more if it didnt take so long to make them. I'm faced with the delimma of: do I buy more of the flexible easy to use molds for about $50 a pair... or go for the metal mold that will pour at least 4 at a time.

Some people seem to swear by the metal molds and some seem to swear at them...since I already have a pair of the rubber ones... I am leaning towards just buying another pair. But I am tempted by the multi cavitiy pour on the metal ones...

has anyone else had to make this decision ?

charlotte
 

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Have you thought about making your own molds?
 

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:) I've thought about it so much you cant believe..but when I price the "goop" you use to make them (plus shipping). I realize that I may mess it up and still have as much money invested as if I have purchased the molds..LOL

I'll get up the nerve to try it someday though.... love to play in "goop" :)
 

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I love the poly molds from Mann Lake. And if you need to speed uo the process, pour the candle, let the top solidify and place in cooler for about 30 minutes.

Mann Lake also has this great deal where if you spend more hten $200 on poly molds, they sell you them for 30% off. Great freakin deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yea, I know about the Mann Lake wholesale thing. That's why I'm trying to decide between the flex or metal mold.. I wish they had 8" instead of just 10" in the metal.
 

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I realize that I am taking you in another direction, but have you considered hand-dipped tapers? Using a dipping vat ($27.50 from Dadant) and 3 dipping racks ($19.50 each) I made 54 pairs of candles in one day. One benefit of hand-dipping is that when your candles are the desired size, you can take them off the racks and let them cool elsewhere. Then you can immediately re-wick the racks and start another batch of candles.

It seems to me that if you want to make a lot of molded candles, then you need a lot of molds since you have to allow the candles to cool in the molds.
David
 

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It seems to me that if you want to make a lot of molded candles, then you need a lot of molds since you have to allow the candles to cool in the molds.
David
Problem I've had with hand dipping tapers is maintaining consistency... some end up a little longer then others, some end up a little fatter than others, some end up lumpy.

My plan is to find a taper design that I like, get several of them, and make a multi-cavity flexible mold. Of course, my customers seem to really like the fact that my current candles are hand-dipped, and it means I can justify charging more for them. If only I could devise a way to produce pairs of tapers with the wicks joined to mimic hand-dipped... but it would require splitting the molds, which potentially means seam marks.

Some day.. when I have time... :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
David, I've never tried hand dipping with the proper equipment. I did try it will a metal soup can in a water bath and the end result was not pretty:doh:
 

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The Joys of Candlemaking! Why isn't as easy as the "How To" books show us?!!

DT: My tapers definitely vary in length and thickness and they are a bit lumpy - that is the sign of being hand-made that my customers are looking for. Each method has its advantages. For instance, using the dipping racks makes it very easy to display the tapers in pairs with one continuous wick. I think the key is to pick one method and stick with it - as you gain experience your candles should get better.

CD: The soup can idea is interesting - the can was probably too short. I think I've read about using a can in one of the candle-making books. The dipping vat I use is about 18" tall and my tapers are 10".

Thankfully we can re-melt our mistakes and try again!
David
 

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You can unmold your tapers in about one hour. I make Shabbat candles for a few Jewish customers and end up making about 300 candles in a period of about a week. I unmold every hour and have no problems.

I also don't think you would ever regret buying more molds. I have six 12", six 10", six 8" and six 5" (for Shabbat candles). I can make a pot load of tapers at a time and I only make them about once every couple of weeks unless I have a big order.
 

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what about poly molds from brushy mountain,,,,They sell them in like sets of 6 or 10. I dented my nice new metal mold up pretty bad. :doh: trying to get the candles out the mold.
 

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Chris, you do have to use care with metal molds as far as not dropping them, but, if you use release spray (don't have to spray every single time) the candles don't stick. There are two tricks I've learned. One I discovered by accident and kind of goes against what would seem logical. Once the candles cool, to release them, push down on each candle, as if trying to push it into the mold. You'll feel it "pop" and it will slide right out. That works 95 percent of the time. If they still don't release, put them in the freezer for 5 minutes and repeat the popping out. I've never had one stick after doing that. I love the fact that they are much cheaper than poly, and with 2 molds I can pour 16 candles at a time.
 

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i follow the same directions as Berk. However I also use a wooden spoon on the mold when it is completely cool....NOT HARD...the flat side of the spoon, gentle tap to release the candle. One can actually hear it release. It all of a sudden sounds like a hollow mold.
 
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