Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two hives and both are queenless right now. One has started queen cells the other has not, and has no eggs or uncapped larva to do so with. (Actually neither have eggs or uncapped larva at this point.) I would like to take one of the queen cells from hive A. and place it in hive B. However, all queen cells are on the same frame.

How do I safely cut it out and place it in the next cell?

Time isn’t my friend here, so any reply’s would be appreciated before I do it to the best of my ability.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
In my experience this is very doable on wax if there are no wires in the way and it's not on the bottom bar. If it's on plastic or a wire running through it, or it's attached to the bottom bar etc. then I wluld not try to cut it out. If it is on wax, wait until it's not new white wax anymore (preferably slightly papery on the tip) and cut wide around it. Remove a frame. Gently put it between two brood combs in the hive you want to introduce it to. Make a gap big enough to easily get it in, slide the frame over until it's touching, but not squashing it. Then add frames as needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
I would also ask you to think the timeline backwards and try to remember if there were eggs/young larvae available few days before you saw the queen cells. If you are unsure about the egg/young larvae availability prior to seeing the queen cells then the queen cells may not be really queen cells! I have seen hive with laying workers create sealed cells and then tear them out few days after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,066 Posts
You are in a precarious position right now. With both hives queenless, you should consider buying a queen for the one without the queen cells rather than risking both hives petering out before they get a new queen laying before your flow or going laying worker. I understand if you can't afford it or want to try the grafting and roll the dice. Just be sure you know the potential downfall of losing both hives. I am pretty risk-adverse, so would buy a queen, but also understand rolling the dice. J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
MB gave the advice you requested but if it were me I would try to purchase a queen.

Try this phone number, it is for a North Carolina queen breeder, (252) 813-4726.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for ll the advice. Both cells have been “taken down”. So now I will be buying two queens.
 

·
Super Moderator
Santa Cruz, CA
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
Thank you for ll the advice. Both cells have been “taken down”. So now I will be buying two queens.
Did you move one over to the other hive?

Often when a queen emerges the bees will quickly tear down the cells - as if they were never there.

I'd make darn sure you don't have a virgin in both, or one of the hives before adding another queen. Just a waste of money at that point. You could give them another 7-14 days and check back for eggs from your new laying queen. If one hive is hopelessly queenless I'd combine them into one and then split it out into two in 4-6 weeks allowing the queenless side to raise a queen - when it's later in the season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you again for the advice. In the future I’ll keep that in mind about the possible emergence of the queen causing the take down. I did move one cell but then saw it gone the next day.

So because I’m in a troubling situation, and because the queens I purchased required a 1 hour drive I just replaced both. Maybe a battle royals will ensue, but at his point I’ll take the financial hit to insure I have a queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
One more question. The queens I purchased are mated and laying. How long after release should I expect to see eggs? Is there an adjustment period or do they usually go right to it?
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
2,522 Posts
once released 3 or 4 days you should have eggs. did you release them or let the bees work thru the candy plug?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
once released 3 or 4 days you should have eggs. did you release them or let the bees work thru the candy plug?
Ummmm sometimes.... sometimes not. Keep them in the cage (corked) and judge the behavior of the workers. Are they clinging too and biting at the cage. If so a queen probably there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The bees worked through the candy plug. Workers were around the cage but gentle. I think they accepted them well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,135 Posts
One more question. The queens I purchased are mated and laying. How long after release should I expect to see eggs? Is there an adjustment period or do they usually go right to it?
Adjustment. The longer they have been out of service, the longer to start laying. It can be as much as a couple of weeks.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top