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I am expecting my first two packages of bees tomorrow so I just made some syrup. Five Qts. of water to 10Lbs. of sugar. When the water came to a rolling boil I added the sugar and removed it from the heat and poured it into a five gallon bucket. I was expecting it to be clear but it is just a little discolored, is this normal? I took it off of heat as soon as I added the sugar so it would not caralize. Just wanted to make sure the slight discoloration was o.k. Thanks
 

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You made carmelized sugar syrup with the boiling water. Like stated above, just hot tap water will dissolve the sugar rapidly.
My recipe is half a 25# bag in a five gallon bucket. Add enought hot water to mix and dissolve the sugar, then fill almost full with cold water and serve. I make two buckets at once this way with a 25# bag. It may not be exact 1:1 but it's close. My bees love it.
 

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I took pictures of it, take a look should I use it or not? I did not keep it on heat after adding the sugar. The book I read said to do it this way. But many other things I have read in that book turned out to be false. I won't say the name of the book but it is starting to make me feel like real "Dummies" :(
1) http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e331/Ruben111/DSCN3765.jpg
2) http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e331/Ruben111/DSCN3764.jpg
3) http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e331/Ruben111/DSCN3763.jpg
 

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Short and sweet....Feed the bees.

I dump ten pounds of sugar in large pot, add a gallon of water and stir until the water begins to boil and the granules liquify. From what others say, that's the worst way you can do it.....It still works.

The bes don't care how you do it, as long as they get fed.
 

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by no means did you caramelize the sugar. Come on guys.... caramelization happens at the very high temprature. This is basic sugar knowledge... at least from a chefs stand point.

Caramelization happens when the water evaperates so there is more sugar by volume to water. Water is the safe guard to slow down carmalization.

If you do not bring the sugar and water up to a boil after adding the sugar in, you will have a lot of sugar crystals on the bottom of your pot. Tons of them. I made a big batch and didnt bring the water and sugar to a boil and used what I needed and left the rest in the pot just to find this.

To prevent this... add the sugar to hot water and bring it up to a boil. Cut the heat and cool. Add to buckets. If you still have some left over in the pot, you will not have sugar crystals.

Trust me on the caramelization issue.... we use about 200 pounds of caramelized sugar a week at our establishment.
 

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I wouldn't think caramelization would matter all that much as long as the bees can go on cleansing flights regularly. But why boil when the water from the tap is hot enough for 1:1?
 

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Sorry Chef, I was generalizing what the picture shows as being brown colored. I don't have a chef's point of view. ;) Thanks for clarifying it though
 

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Dcross

See... in sugar.. somewhat like chocolate, there are alpha and beta crystals. Alpha crystals will melt at a lower temprature... say around 175 degrees or so. But.... beta crystals only melt at 212 degrees. If you just disolve the Alpha crystals, you will have beta crystals not dissolved and they will ding to the bottom of the pot. Big problem in the long run? No.... not really.

Please... no jokes concering capa crystals.
 

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I used to make mine in a turkey fryer, just put in 10 pounds of water and 10 pounds of sugar and began heating, stirring occasionally until it began to boil and let it boil for 30 seconds or so and turn off the heat. Let cool and place in feeders. I tended to like boiling as this was one step I thought would prolong the life of the syrup a bit longer before it would go bad..?? Now just buy HFCS 55.
 

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The carmelization process doesn't begin to occur until the sugar in the solution reaches a temperature of 320 degrees. Even allowing for geographic elevation and atmospheric low pressure, water will boil in the neighborhood of 212 - 230 degrees, well below the temperature necessary to carmelize pure sugar, let alone sugar that's dissolved in water.
 

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>The carmelization process doesn't begin to occur until the sugar in the solution reaches a temperature of 320 degrees.

When the surface of the pan is in contact with direct flame it's quite possible for the surface to be 320 degrees. That's enough to burn some of the sugar.

Boil the water. Add the sugar.
 
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