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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are putting out 100 packages in a day or 2 and I want to have the feed all out so I don't have to reopen the hives to do it after hiving them. What issues (if any) will I have with cooler syrup ? I do have honey in some of the combs in each hive, so they can eat that if the syrup is too cold for them.
Daytime temps are around 1-5 C

Thanks
 

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They wont take it down if its too cold out. Had some last year with a frame of feed on the inside of the wall comb they still starved. Last year was a package disaster!! Sugar on top???
 

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What type of feeder are you using to feed the bees?

If it's a frame feeder, you may be able to get the syrup warm enough by putting it in the south position. Between thermal gain and bee heating interior of hive, you will likely get the syrup warm enough. Close entrance down to 3/4 inch so you draft minimal heat out.

Don't imagine you are getting a lot of flying at 5C. If temp gets warm enough to fly, there's numerous types of open feeders. The large rubber totes with a lid looked interesting. Put float material in such as wood sticks and straw and fill with syrup. Drill a number of 3-4 inch holes in front side of lid so bees can access syrup. Could just install a days supply of warm syrup before bees fly. Could take tote inside in the evening to keep syrup warm and once you know daily consumption just add that amount of warm syrup each day. You don't have to move in doors each evening that way. Put tote in a sunny location out of the wind.

There was a thread about a month ago.

Other options are 5 gallon pail feeders put out each day, barrel feeders, V pig trough style, and I'm sure there are more.
 

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Gallon baggie feed, Ben.
I gave each hive a bag on top of the hive frames. You can use a cardboard square
to put the bag on also. Of course, I put an empty super on top of the existing hive too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Frame feeders is what I am using with a float in them, some of them are ladder with the wooden cap, but this year I bought the open ones and using a float for the packages. I have a large syrup tote but I haven't anywhere to store it in a warm spot, so I guess I will wait and see, most frames have honey in them and some are a full frame of capped honey.
 

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In that case, take the syrup inside the house where it is warmer than the outside temp. I don't know if you have
the 5 gal. bucket or not. 5x10 = 50 gal. for 50 hives. Don't know if those inside feeders are the 1 or 2 gal feeder?
I have a big stock pot here 55 gal so can warm up some syrup to mixed with the cold. You have a metal drum?
Then put the warm syrup inside the hive feeders. The capped honey frames they will not open it to eat in colder temp.
They rather use it to keep warm than eating the honey. But with the syrup they will eat and store away the extra.
 

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Good advice beepro. Get the warm feed in the frame feeder as close to the cluster as possible, not on the outside edge. If you have access to a frame filler that would be ideal.
 

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I think your good to go Ben. If there is honey in those frames, break the cappings so they will access the honey right away.
they will go for the syrup when they break cluster.
 

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Yes, definitely next to the cluster as possible. On the edge will get cold faster and the bees not willing to
travel that far for syrup because the colder the temp. they cluster tighter together in the middle of the
hive. For some reason they like the middle rather than clustering on the edge. Since you have the syrup
might as well give them patty on top of the cluster and the dry sugar too to take some of the
moisture out. They will have lots of moisture for sure because of the syrup inside. I don't like the temp.
you are having now. Better get beezy to prepare for them now.
 

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When I was hiving packages in cool spring weather, I was always expanding and put the packages on last years wet extracted frames with a honey frame from a winter deadout in the middle. You might consider spraying or dipping a couple frames in syrup for each brood box you have to set up. That initial start is the problem until the bees get organized, or was for me as I shook packages with six inches of fresh snow on the ground. Those ten bees clinging to the wire in the box always broke my heart but they just would not let go.
 

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Filling frames with syrup is a good idea, but I would advise against it when freshly hiving packages. I did this once, and did not work. If the frame is dry, then its good but if the frame is wet with syrup the bees will try climbing on it and soak themselves, to die.
 

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Too much work! 100 hives x 10 frames in each box? 1000 frames!
He'll be exhausted by then. Even if not that many the syrup will not
last long with this method. More good, practical suggestions please.
 

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I am with Ian on this one. If you have frames of honey you should be good. Once they start raising brood you will need to feed. I am not a fan of frame feeders. They add a lot of moisture and are hard on bees. We use pails on the lids and open feeding.
 

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I misread the amount of honey the op had. Looks like a lot so yes I agree scraping so of the middle frames should be adequate. Warm weather can't be that far away.
Dgl not a big fan of frame feed either that's why I still have a couple of 100 wrapped in plastic. Tuition in the school of hard knocks is expensive.
 

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Filling frames with syrup is a good idea, but I would advise against it when freshly hiving packages. I did this once, and did not work. If the frame is dry, then its good but if the frame is wet with syrup the bees will try climbing on it and soak themselves, to die.
Good to know.i have never used a frame filler for packages. I use it the odd time for splits with very uneven amounts of feed.
 
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