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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The bees in the photo from northern Aleppo, Syria are probably Anatolian or Anatolian hybrid instead of Syrian bees. Syrian bees are only found farther south than that.

Syrian bee photos in Jordan:

Another photo of light bees with dark tipped abdomens from Jordan:

Aggressive light colony's after swarm here in North Carolina. Syrian genetics? (set the youtube video at higher Resolution to see better the light colored bees with dark tipped abodemns):
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Apis mellifera yemenitica ("Y" lineage) are similar genetically to A. m. lamarkii (Egyptian bee, "A" or "Z" lineage) and A. m. syriaca (Syrian bee, "A" or "Z" lineage):

Taxonomic tree of honeybee subspecies:

It would be cool if they test Cyprian bee (Apis mellifera cypria) to see if they are "O" lineage or not, unless they already done that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Apis mellifera yemenitica ("Y" lineage) are similar genetically to A. m. lamarkii (Egyptian bee, "A" or "Z" lineage) and A. m. syriaca (Syrian bee, "A" or "Z" lineage):

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Reading online I am confused about which bee lineages are valid lineages:
Are entomologists studying bees from hybridization zones causing confusion?

Quote:
"Honey bee subspecies are assigned to these linages using morphometry and genetic methods; but variations of the results were observed between the two approaches. For Example, the Egyptian honey bees, A. m. lamarckii, in A lineage based on morphometry (Ruttner, 1988) but in O lineage based on mtDNA (Arias and Sheppard, 1996). Also, the Yemeni honey bees, A. m. jemenitica, in A lineage according to morphometry (Ruttner, 1988) and in Y lineage based on mtDNA (Coulibaly et al., 2019). Indeed, transition zones were detected between some subspecies (Kandemir et al., 2006a, Dukku, 2016, Alburaki et al., 2011)."
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The bees in the photo from northern Aleppo, Syria are probably Anatolian or Anatolian hybrid instead of Syrian bees. Syrian bees are only found farther south than that.

Syrian bee photos in Jordan:

Another photo of light bees with dark tipped abdomens from Jordan:

Aggressive light colony's after swarm here in North Carolina. Syrian genetics? (set the youtube video at higher Resolution to see better the light colored bees with dark tipped abodemns):
There are very light colored bees in Iraq, too. That is where Persian bees (Apis mellifera meda) are said to be.
(See the light bees at 0:31. A. m. meda?)

A. m. meda and A. m. anatoliaca are now in the sublineage "Z" of the "A" lineage, the same as the Syrian bee:
 
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