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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Benefits of nucs:
  1. Small hives can make more brood for their size.
  2. more queens
I'm trying to become TF (treatment free). For now, this involves buying hygienic queens every year, queen rearing, and treating some hives with OAV.

How I plan to manage hives when I'm TF:
If a hive needs help with mites, I kill the queen, and give them a brood break. They should have enough hygiene because the breeder queen was hygienic.
Brood break hives and dead outs will have lots of stores to give to nucs.

My equipment: 10 fr. foundationless mediums

Desired equipment:
  1. nucs next to each other for heat (like Michael Palmer double nucs)
  2. peg hives
  3. Prevent toppling with shared cover, peg hive clips,...
  4. compatible with common equipment
  5. good bee space
  6. Mini frames
    1. for mating nucs with >2 frames: They need honey, capped brood, and a small amount of open brood (to attract nurse bees). Its hard to find this in 2 frames.
    2. used in winter
  7. All hives are the same size for winter.
Suggestions?
 

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Registered
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1,083 Posts
Benefits of nucs:
  1. Small hives can make more brood for their size.
  2. more queens
I'm trying to become TF (treatment free). For now, this involves buying hygienic queens every year, queen rearing, and treating some hives with OAV.

How I plan to manage hives when I'm TF:
If a hive needs help with mites, I kill the queen, and give them a brood break. They should have enough hygiene because the breeder queen was hygienic.
Brood break hives and dead outs will have lots of stores to give to nucs.

My equipment: 10 fr. foundationless mediums

Desired equipment:
  1. nucs next to each other for heat (like Michael Palmer double nucs)
  2. peg hives
  3. Prevent toppling with shared cover, peg hive clips,...
  4. compatible with common equipment
  5. good bee space
  6. Mini frames
    1. for mating nucs with >2 frames: They need honey, capped brood, and a small amount of open brood (to attract nurse bees). Its hard to find this in 2 frames.
    2. used in winter
  7. All hives are the same size for winter.
Suggestions?
Insulated singles, social spacing, survival of the fittest - 3-4% survival possible, grow from there. Are you planning on farming them or propagating Varroa resistant colonies only? Also suggest looking into Hawaiian Queens from the big island.
 
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