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sorry for this question its really elementary, but i've heard of people switching brood chambers on a double hive body in this spring. So my questions is why do that?
 

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Puts the brood back at the bottom... The queen doesn't like to move down so when spring comes and the cluster is in the top body you swap them to put them back in the bottom.
 

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It is done to help prevent swarming. It gives the bees and open area above to move into. Some people like to do it as soon as they see the dandilion bloom. That was about 2 1/2 weeks ago for me. I reversed my deeps 3 weeks ago and have booth boxes full of brood as of yesterday the bees have moved up.
 

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Saying that the queen doesn't like to move down seems a bit odd to me. If this were the case, it seems like once she got into the top brood chamber, wouldn't we have to move rotate the boxes again? I left a super on a hive just for safe keeping, was actually going to use the honey frames to help suppliment another colony, and never got to it. I don't know if it help the colony out over winter, but that colony is REALLY strong right now. I replaced a failing queen with a queen from Kona and man, I couldn't be happier unless she was only laying in the bottom 2 brood chambers, she's in all 3 boxes. I thought about finding her, making sure she was back in the bottom 2, then putting an excluder on, but figured, "hey, if she wants to be a go getter and lay that many eggs, it will only result in a more powerful work force later on."
 

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So my questions is why do that?
It makes the beekeeper think he/she is doing something to help the bees. As Batman pointed out, the rest of the summer the queen will move up and down between the lower two brood boxes, so why is it necessary to move her down at the start of spring?

Mr. Bush has a good quote from Richard Taylor regarding switching boxes near the bottom of this page:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm
 

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If you are interested in swarm control, switch the hive bodies during the dandilion flow, putting the brood on the bottom. This way you can clean out your bottom boards at the same time (if you are so inclined to). If you have the non-swarming breed of Honeybees, don't switch boxes, no worries. If you do what others say and it doesn't work, change it up. If it works, you might be ahead of the game.

"...the rest of the summer the queen will move up and down between the lower two brood boxes, so why is it necessary to move her down at the start of spring?"

Answer: it's not moving her down, it's moving the brood down, and putting empty space above the brood for expansion. If they feel they can expand, vs the feeling of being crowded they are less apt to swarm.
 

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Saying that the queen doesn't like to move down seems a bit odd to me. If this were the case, it seems like once she got into the top brood chamber, wouldn't we have to move rotate the boxes again?
I said doesn't like to move down. I didn't say she wouldn't work downwards, she will lay where ever she can find space, but she finds that space faster on her way up.

I had a hive last summer that I did not switch and the queen never went back to the bottom box... she worked her way up to the very top where she stayed and the bees filled the brood chamber and the lower supers with stores. (I don't use queen excludes)

One thing I like to pay close attention to when doing removals every year is how the bees do things in wild colonies... In my experience the brood is almost always at the top of the colony; which makes sense because that is where they started drawing comb from and the queen starts laying once comb is drawn. I sometimes find brood in the middle if the cavity is very small, but if they have the space she stays at the top.
 
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