Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I started my hive on May 25th. Unfortunately was not advised to start 2 so I could compare. Everything seems ok up to this point, but how do I know. Population is growing rapidly. Last week's inspection I had all but two of the ten frames drawn so I added a super and continued feeding them sugar water to help stimulate them to draw out the super. I did an inspection today and the hive top feeder was completely
Empty. I expected to have the super drawn more, only a partial frame. My question is, is it normal for the super to take this long to be drawn and also can I change to an entrance feeder so I can see when they need more sugar water? Another question is should I keep feeding and is there another supplement I should be giving them to help them draw out the super?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,313 Posts
If I was you I'd keep feeding them and get them built for winter. I don't like entrance feeders I just open feed in the spring. I have top feeders but don't use them any more I only feed my nucs when there's nothing coming in {nectar}and I use a QT. jar in a deep {nuc} over the brood . If there booming I would not worry about supplement they are probably bring in all they need right now.
In the spring I use bee pro. Good luck.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,070 Posts
Welcome to Beesource!

I suggest you stick with the top feeder. The problem with entrance feeders is that it is all to easy for 'foreign' bees to access the entrance feeder. This can lead to robbing and bees dying fighting robbers.

Bees are only going to build comb when they have something they want to put in it. If you want more comb built faster than their nectar collection rate demands, then you will have to feed. However, whether you should continue to feed is a management choice that only you can make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Welcome! I'm a new beek too, as of 4/10 when my packages came (3). My primary mentor uses entrance feeders, and so do I. Like all beekeeping topics, there's a lot of disagreement on them. I've used gallon baggies on the frames and entrance feeders, and I like the convenience of the entrance feeders. I'm only feeding one hive now, and I've got a small piece of wood by the feeder to further reduce the entrance down and give the girls an easier entrance to defend. That's just my two cents. The earlier posts are by much more experienced beeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
When you feed bees do so in gallons. The demands of a well populated hive for drawing comb, feeding brood and each other are significant. Unless you want to visit the bee yard each day to add a quart of syrup i recomment a hive top feeder. I made am modified version with a 12" square of plywood with 4 holes near the corners, banded with a strip of wood 5/8" H x 3/4" W to raise it. The holes are about 3 1/4" in diameter two are screened with #7 hardware cloth and two hold the lid for 1/2 gallon jars, the jar kids have 1/16" holes. The 12" plywood is placed on the inner cover over the vent hole and the jars are inverted in the holes in the plywood without screens. I enclose all this in a deep super or some boxes made from 1X10's. I like this as there aren't any drowing or robbing issues, good ventilation is maintained, it's easy to check (no loose bees), and it forces the bees up when I put on a new super. Not saying this is right, seems to work for me. Also, If your bees aren't gathering pollen you may want to think about supplementing their protien as well. Good Luck I always learn someting new when I visit the bees.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top