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I thought it was the result of the way God made them.

If what you say is true, then who was the "good" beekeeper that figured this out - since I don't think I have ever heard of a keeper who hadn't had a swarm.

Mike
 

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I've never had a swarm. But then, I consider myself an average beekeeper so maybe that's part of it...not smart enough to let them swarm and not bad enough to kill them all off. :cool:

Oh...and I split pretty hard in the spring...so maybe that has something to do with it. I do recover swarms...so I'm actually glad there are those out there that like to share their bees with others. :applause:
 

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Everyone has their own opinion.:doh:

A swarm is simply procreation of the species.

I have 3 kids...i guess someone's keeping me poorly :gh:
 

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Should have included this in my other post...

When feral bees become crowded inside of a hollow tree or other cavity, they swarm to resolve problems...
So unless this wild hive in a tree has problems they will be the only bees and will eventually have to move since they will out grow that tree.
 

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I've never had a swarm.
I Kept bees from late 70's through late 80's and only remember one swarm. This year I had 5 of 8 of my original colonies swarm. Read about it here:
http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=237603&highlight=bee+experiments&page=4

Oh...and I split pretty hard in the spring...so maybe that has something to do with it.
:scratch: Let me see. I split my original 8 colonies to 20 the first week of March. By March 19, I had what I thought was supercedure cells in 2 of these colonies and couldn't find the queens. Thought I had maybe killed them making splits. But of course I guess I should have known they quit laying in anticipation of swarming, colonies which I had split just two weeks earlier. Also, we had 3 late snows this year and the bees were slow builing up.

Some of my colonies were deep w/ med brood box and some were 3 mediums. those that were deep w/ med. I reversed brood boxes and those that were 3 mediums I checkerboarded. The BeeWeaver 3 meds. [chekerboarded], did not swarm, and the Tecumseh and Bush queen had 1 deep w/med. brood box were reversed, also did not swarm.

Results: By 4/15 3 of my original 8 [with the original queens, not the new queen splits] swarmed. By 5/10 5 of my original 8 colonies had swarmed. None of my splits with the new queens had swarmed even though they were given the bulk of the brood and bees [but of course they were all Italians].:scratch:

The 1 of the 8 that did not swarm was my weakest colonies [Bush queen]. Another was Tecumseh queen which was not introduced until October and had not built up strong [they were weak going into the winter]. The last one was my strongest BeeWeaver queen. The 5/8 were my best except for my Bweaver queen which actually was my strongest but she did not swarm.

I am open to suggestions, about what I should have done different?

Personally, I think it has as much to do with the prevalent carniolian race of bees as it does anything else. Every single colony that swarmed had queen cups on a regular basis on the colony last year and this year, a prevalent sign of the carniolian race isn't it? My Tecumseh MHQ [showing mainly cordovan coloration], and my BWeaver queen, mostly yellow Italian coloration, and My michael Bush queen [also yellow Italian coloration, although this colony was slow building up] did not swarm; nor did any of my new Italian queens.

Last Comment: But I guess I have to admit, keeping queens which were apparently of the carniolian race in my apiary was poor management which I should have recognized with all the queen cups. But, I can tell you this it won't happen again. When I see a queen cell cup the queen gets:pinch:
 

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That you know of.
I haven't murdered anyone either...that I know of. What are you saying? I don't know my own hives? Isn't it always refreshing how some people try and justify their own issues by applying them to others. :scratch:
 

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However, swarming of honey bee hive usually is a sign of poor beekeeping practices...
Wow, and people think that I stir the pot?

Actually, 'good beekeeper', there are those who allow the hives in their care to swarm as they choose. Allowing nature to run it's own course.

Many of the methods people put to effect in the bee yards depends on the approach and expectations, objectives they have in working with bees.

Your ways and objectives may be different from mine hence...
"Your Mileage may Vary"

Big Bear
 

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Hives do not swarm because of problems. If a hive has problems, it is too weak to swarm.

Managed hives swarm because the beekeeper did such a great job of helping them become strong enough to swarm.
 

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I can see boris' point. For those of us who are commercial, swarming can be a detriment to honey production and to bee production. Because in the end, you have a hive that does not produce well. Granted it will have a young queen, and that young queen will be an amazingly fast layer, but now that hive comes out of honey production and goes into the wintering yards. Now that hive will cost more to keep since it will not produce much.

However, if you catch the first swarm, and the original queen is in the swarm, and in a few days starts laying, that hive will make up the difference in honey production since it has most of the foragers.

The key will be to catch the original swarm, and keep the after swarms to a minimum

Catch 22
 

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For those of us who are commercial, swarming can be a detriment to honey production and to bee production.
This is what I mean by people have different objectives and interests in working with honey bees. Some have commercial interests which in order to make a living requires special attention to retention of colonies.

For those not in comm. or operating differently, things can vary greatly.
 

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I must be the world's worst beekeeper then! Out of about 80 hives we put on the citrus flow in March, about 40-50 swarmed. Still made a lot of honey! They built up late and really only turned on after the flow started. Never had that problem before, but then we've never had winter weather like this years cold spell. Don't feel bad for us though; I pulled into one of our yards one morning and the first hive in the line was swarming. Caught them and took them back home. The original hive put on 2 full med supers (capped) after the swarm, in addition to the deep they had already filled. the swarm is now real strong in an 8 frame box. Last weekend we went through and pulled honey out of the brood boxes to open them up; got another 1 2/3 barrels. Would I rather they didn't swarm? Sure! But, it's not the end of the world when they do.
 

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I think alot has to do with how many hives you have and how much time you can dedicate to managing them and how knowledgeable you are with the various swarming control techniques.

I myself want to prevent swarming and still they swarmed. So my current process of splitting the bees didn't work as well as I thought it should.

While I don't consider myself as having poor beekeeping practices, I am up to learning new ways to improve my odds of keeping my bees.
 

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Considering the declining number of honey bees in nature (for whatever reason) maybe a few of us should practice some minor 'poor' beekeeping behavior before all of the remaining bees are in man made hives. Thoughts of caged 'panda' bears come to mind.
 
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