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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been getting some swarm traps set up here in PA - haven't heard of any swarms around here yet - and I'm just wondering what some of the secrets are to attaching swarm traps to trees / buildings, etc.

I've seen / heard about rope, chains, handles on side of trap, etc. I have several 10 frame deeps with bottom board and lid waiting to be installed in some places, but looking for easy - "Why didn't I think of that?" ways to attach.

I am for the first time this year also trying the cheap trap method of a "cardboard box ream of paper with a frame of drawn comb in it". I'm kind of at a loss though on how to cheaply waterproof it and get it hung. Any ideas?
 

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I put up five swarm traps this week. The traps are home made 1 1/2 story nuc boxes with a French cleat and they can be screwed to a tree or strapped with a ratchet strap. If you do a search here on Beesource you may find some pics of a French cleat.
 

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I put out 10 frame old brood boxes set up as traps. I place them in the windows of old houses or make a platform between two trees on the edge of a wood line and seat the trap on it. has worked great for me. Not sure how the cardboard traps would work due to the elements. I've had some traps out for a month before catching a swarm so the heat and rain would do some damage to a cardboard trap. May can put them in sheltered areas like houses or shelters. Happy trapping!!,
 

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I don't do anything special. I set them on walls, tables, old car hoods, hive stands, chairs, blocks of wood, nursery cans, decks...yes there is a deep bait hive buried under those bees. San Jose, California



 

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I made angle brackets (like L brackets with a 3rd leg) from recycled 2x2s, and use ratchet straps to attach those to the vertical part of a tree trunk. Set the trap on top of the flat part of the upside-down L and level the trap with some shims.

My traps are regular hive bodies with painted [recycled] plywood lids, but for cardboard you could use some cheap plastic drop cloth to wrap the box.
 

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I use an old 10 frame deep with a scrap piece of 1"x4" screwed to one side. At the top of the board is a hole drilled to fit over a limb, nail, spike, etc. You can make the board whatever length is convenient. The one thing I would change from the pic below, is to have a smaller entrance. However, as you can see, it did work.

 

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I do something similar to homesteader.with a one by 6 board not as long as the one in his picture.bolted onto an eight or ten frame box. It could be screwed on but they tend to loosen overtime with the weight.

the only thing I do different is place a long the nail about 6 inches above the other nail (put it in when I install hive so I don't upset swarm bees) so I can slip a pulley on there and easily lower the box attaching a rope to the cut out circle , around the pulley , and down to the ground.

Makes it a non dangerous 1 person job.

I also put a circle entrance disc on the entrance so I can easily close the hive before lowering (usually the night before).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
PAHunter62 - thanks for the information on a french cleat. The video certainly explains it.

I did come up with an idea for my cardboard boxes. Once the two frames of drawn comb are added, I tape the lid on and then shrink wrap it with plastic. (We have rolls of it at work for shrink wrapping pallets and parts.)

I then cut the entrance hole and tape around the hole so the plastic doesn't get in the way and add a few drops of lemon grass oil. Right now I have two cardboard swarm traps out - one is out in the open up in a deer hunting stand and the other is sitting on the back porch of my sister's house. I just got two more finished and have to figure out where to put them.

The shrink wrap will certainly make the box last for 1 swarm season. We will see if the cardboard traps will actually coax a swarm to move in.
 

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I use an old 10 frame deep with a scrap piece of 1"x4" screwed to one side. At the top of the board is a hole drilled to fit over a limb, nail, spike, etc. You can make the board whatever length is convenient. The one thing I would change from the pic below, is to have a smaller entrance. However, as you can see, it did work.

You know if you cut an opening into the hanger hole so that it is a hook instead of a round hole you could sometimes hang that on a limb. Good design though - strong, simple. I like it. Bet it's heavy once some bees move in though.
 

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if you cut an opening into the hanger hole so that it is a hook instead of a round hole you could sometimes hang that on a limb.
I had that same idea when I had to put a spike in the tree instead of finding anything to hang it from. This was my first time using this design, and I've since picked up some good ideas on improvements.
 

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I have 40+ traps, so I don't have time for straps, ladders, French cleats, brackets, screws...
Need something that is quick and will hold a box full of bees during a storm.

I have found a increase in the amount of swarms caught in traps 10ft and higher, and an even higher increase in the few traps that are 15 Ft and higher.

The eye screws hold the lid on as well a place to attach the string.

I throw the roll over a branch and hoist it up, takes 2 minutes.


Beehive Insect Bee Honeycomb Honeybee
 
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