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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend caught a swarm last week that entered one of his nucs up in a tree however the nuc is too small for the colony. All day and into the evening a cluster hangs on the bottom board. Other problem is the nuc is difficult for him to get off the tree so it will cause some commotion if he tries to move it.

Is his best bet to transfer the nuc frames and queen into a deep, leave the nuc where it is to catch the returning foragers, then shake the returned foragers and any bees in the cluster into the deep? After the chaos close up the deep box and leave it closed for 2-3 days with capped stores before opening up to let them reorient to the new location.

He knows the clock is ticking.....

Thanks,
Kevin
 

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Set a larger hive under the tree.
Move all frames from the trap into the hive (one by one if must).
Ideally it will be confirmed that the queen is on one of the frames.
Shake the remaining bees into the hive OR in front of it.
Remove the trap from the tree (so there is nothing for the bees to return to).
Done.

Within 1-2 days the bees will gather into the larger hive.
If concerned of the swarm absconding - install a queen excluder at the entrance so that the queen would not leave (not mandatory and only until the queen is laying; then remove).

PS: here is another case of issues caused by a trap on a tree;
on the ground you could just added an extra box or set the receiving hive side by side and move the bees;
If really must go up the tree - the first question is always:
- How do I take this thing down when full of bees and honey?
If you have no clear answer - then don't go up.
 

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Set a larger hive under the tree.
Move all frames from the trap into the hive (one by one if must).
Ideally it will be confirmed that the queen is on one of the frames.
Shake the remaining bees into the hive OR in front of it.
Remove the trap from the tree (so there is nothing for the bees to return to).
Done.

Within 1-2 days the bees will gather into the larger hive.
If concerned of the swarm absconding - install a queen excluder at the entrance so that the queen would not leave (not mandatory and only until the queen is laying; then remove).

PS: here is another case of issues caused by a trap on a tree;
on the ground you could just added an extra box or set the receiving hive side by side and move the bees;
If really must go up the tree - the first question is always:
- How do I take this thing down when full of bees and honey?
If you have no clear answer - then don't go up.
+1
 

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Possum Valley, TN Bee Wrangler
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Things can get pretty dicey up a ladder or tree trying to handle a heavy box of bees.
 

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When doing "Shake the remaining bees......in front of it (the hive)" it is best to put up some kind of a wide ramp to the entrance and/or spread a sheet in front of the hive with one end raised to the hive entrance.

Basically, these are to make easier for the bees to walk into the hive (but more importantly for the queen! - there is always that chance she ends up outside).
 

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Here’s a photo of the cluster
View attachment 63273
They sit so tight and are big - I wonder IF there are any bees inside at all.
It feels as if they are building combs under the hive and the entire cluster is outside.

Somehow (after the hive is emptied of everything possible - frames, that un-necessary feeder jar, etc) this entire thing needs to be carefully taken down and then - in one strong knock - the entire cluster needs to dropped directly into the bigger hive (a better choice).

Done carefully and slowly and best in the evening (so bees get to spend a night in their new hive; OR they walk into the hive just before the night falls if dropped outside).

What to do next depends on how far will this trapped swarm be moved.
If not far - best to move them asap - I would do the very next morning (very early) and force the reorientation on the new spot immediately.

So yeah - good luck taking this mess down all in one piece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They sit so tight and are big - I wonder IF there are any bees inside at all.
It feels as if they are building combs under the hive and the entire cluster is outside.

Somehow (after the hive is emptied of everything possible - frames, that un-necessary feeder jar, etc) this entire thing needs to be carefully taken down and then - in one strong knock - the entire cluster needs to dropped directly into the bigger hive (a better choice).

Done carefully and slowly and best in the evening (so bees get to spend a night in their new hive; OR they walk into the hive just before the night falls if dropped outside).

What to do next depends on how far will this trapped swarm be moved.
If not far - best to move them asap - I would do the very next morning (very early) and force the reorientation on the new spot immediately.

So yeah - good luck taking this mess down all in one piece.
Wow, you could not have called that any better.

May friend told me that there was only one frame of bees in the nuc and they had started building comb on the outside. Not sure why they would not go in.

He transferred the one frame with bees and managed to wrestle as many on the comb as he could into the deep. He’s not sure if he got the queen or not but they were not happy.

Its raining so that ought to keep them in for a while but Wednesday is 80 degrees so they may not stay long.

Thanks for all the advice - I shared it all with him.

Kevin
 

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Its raining so that ought to keep them in for a while but Wednesday is 80 degrees so they may not stay long.
Well, the Tuesday is the perfect day to do all the moves.
I would not wait until the 80 degree Wednesday.
Rain and cool - perfect and what you want to handle this project.
If this is something like on the picture I attached - I'd move right in because the bees will stay put.
It is good to have a sprayer and spray them under hive generously until wet.
If wet and cool enough, this project can be done any part of the day; no need to wait until evening (usually preferable).
 

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