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Discussion Starter #1
The story so far: A swarm moved into an internal wall of my house via a missing brick under a second floor window. I placed a 5 frame nuc box with old comb with a few drops of lemmon grass oil on top of them on top of a 6' step ladder, and used a bungy cord to strap the box in place. (getting the nuc box within about 6 feet of the missing brick) Today I stopped by the house around noon time to find the air full of bees. Yippee I thought - I don't have to tear the wall apart!

I may have been a bit premature in my celebration.

A swarm has definitely moved into the nuc. Unfortunately when I put my ear to the interior wall upstairs I still hear a pretty good buzz.

A few questions - I can't leave the nuc box on top of the ladder forever - and 5 frames looks to me to be the bare minimum to hold these bees. How soon can I move it and are there any special considerations for moving newly hived swarms. I can move it a couple of hundred feet now or if I wait until Sunday I can move it 70 miles. I don't have a good in between option. If I transfer the bees from a nuc to a regular deep can I go from the top of the ladder to ground level without causing them orientation problems? Or will they just swarm again?

Just to make the mix more interesting - on Saturday I'm hosting the open hive portion of our bee school. I'm open to any interesting suggestions.
 

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You could inspect the box, if the queen and brood are in it then its safe to move 70 miles. If there is no brood in the box you have to attack the wall !!!!.
 

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I've found that when a swarm chooses a location they're pretty much there to stay although when they move into my box I leave them alone for a few days just to be sure. Another words you can probably move the nuc right away, put it in a bigger box, or whatever. Although if they've had time to orient which they'll do the first day then moving a short distance takes on the same challenges as an established hive.

Capturing a swarm is a different story however and they can leave without notice.

I wish I could help you on the brick colony question.

PS I wouldn't bother searching for or worrying about a queen being in the nuc because its almost a given that she's in there if they moved in. I'm inclined to believe that there are two colonies there although I'll be watching to see what happens, good luck.

[ June 13, 2006, 05:30 PM: Message edited by: wade ]
 

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I'd get a cone over that open brick right away and start trapping out the bees. The longer you wait, the more they build. You can add the trapped bees to the nuc. I'd go ahead and set them down on the ground and leave them there while you trap out the swarm.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone for your suggestions. Here's the plan. Once it stops rainng today I'll take the nuc off of the ladder and set it on top of the deep I intend to transfer them into. I'll leave them there until Saturday morning and then do the transfer. Saturday is supposed to be in the 80s here and there isn't decent ventilation in the nuc. The entrance is reduced down to about 2/3 of an inch. Sunday morning they'll get loaded on my truck and moved to their home for the summer.

The screening is purchased for the cone and that will go up this afternoon. Now to figure out how to attach it to brick!

I'll keep you posted.
 
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