Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was able to do a fairly specific inspection today...63 degrees and I found what I thought were queens cells and larvae. Since this is my first time seeing this I wasn't sure. The cells were "kinda" peanut looking but I really couldn't tell because they were attached to the bottom of the top deep frame and the top of the bottom deep frame. I did scrape them off and both large white larvae and white juice came out of the cells. I hope I did the right thing.

I did find the queen, and there was different stages of brood, but not much. I assumed the colony may feel she isn't doing her job and was trying to supersede? or are they trying to swarm? I thought it may be too early for that?

Also, they had about 3 full frames of capped honey in the top box and a couple frames with nothing but a very little half drawn comb. The remaining was capped and un-capped brood (about 60 % - 70%).

I did add another meduim super just in case they needed the room. I don't think I need to feed because of the stores look OK. I'm not sure if I should re-queen, but even if I do queens around here will not be available until end of April/May.

This is my first season with a strong hive and I'm seeing all kinds of different things that I not confident I'm reading correctly and acting accordingly.

With all the above being said I need some advise please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
Well from what I read you look like you did have supersedure cells. I would have left them alone and let the bees raise another queen since they know that she might be failing since she should have about three or more frames full of brood. You can also use the supersedure cells to make more hives. Your old queen might be hurt from not being warm enough this winter and will slowly lose her ability to lay fertile eggs. She may also not have mated properly.
Only time you remove the supersedure cells is if your trying to prevent swarming or you have another queen you want to introduce into the hive.
Dan
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,094 Posts
I'm with Bjerm2. It's early in your location to have swarm cells. They cells sound like swarm cells, but I think it might have been a supercedure. My other concern about the supercedure would be enough drones this time of year.

But all in all I don't destroy queen cells. If I think they are swarming I do splits. If I think they are superceding I don't interfere. The bees usually know better than me if they need a new queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Bjerm2 and Michael. Since it would be early for drones and it appears they were superseding you think its advisable to re-queen with an already fertile queen. This hive was kinda hot anyway and may need new "blood" introduced. I think East Texas Pine Rooter found some Hawiian queens ready.

What you think?
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,094 Posts
Might be a good idea to requeen. It solves several problems. You don't have to worry about the lack of drones, you can destroy all the queen cells (in case they are swarming and because they will reject the new queen if you don't). But I do like getting some local blood in them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,085 Posts
From what I understand supercedure queens can be some of the best queens because the bees aren't in an emergency situation when they choose the larvae to use and are typically well fed with royal jelly. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong.)

I used a supercedure cell to make a nuc last year and it produced an queen that lays a great brood pattern.

I have yet to see a drone here in NW Indiana, although I'm sure there are probably some cooking in there as we speak (type
)

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Dan - I did see drone cells but no drones. But also I was so concerned that I needed to take care of the queen cells I could have missed seeing any???? not sure about that one. Well back to my old philosophy of if you leave them alone...oh well I chalk this up to beginners mistakes and I learned from it. I will not be so hasty next time and think it out before I react.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
I opened a hive and saw several queen cells today... and they were swarm cells. Now, I'm a little South of you (I'm on the border of Missouri/Arkansas), but I'd still guess they were swarm cells. In which case, they'll just make more- you can't stop them from swarming (but you can collect the swarm and have another hive). I'm going to start looking for swarms in the next few days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Michael, I'm glad I took your advice. Just yesterday I went ahead and took out two frames (one had a swarm cell), and made a nuc. Well, today I heard a loud roaring noise out back, and sure enough, that hive swarmed. Nice warm day today, and completely sunny. I was able to capture the swarm fairly easily and took it out to my property (5 miles away). Anyway, it was my first swarm of the season, and I made three hives out of one. Since I'm wanting bees more than honey, that's exactly what I want...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top