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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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NO. Swarm cells are how healthy hives reproduce.

Biological imperative #1 Reproduction of the species.

Some bees are swarmier than others, so using swarm cells from those hives is likely to continue the trait. But then, a grafted cell from the same hive would give you the same result. Swarm cells usually produce the very best and largest queens since the queen is being purposefully made and is given the best nutrition the hive can offer.
 

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You cannot automatically rule out the genetic component. Some strains of bees are determined to swarm as early and often as possible. Collecting a maximum number of that genetics would seem to me encourage that transaction. I regularly use swarm cells from superior colonies though, so choose your poison.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Here on our place we try to breed out of the swarmier traits with the help of sue colby.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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If you use swarm cells to re queen that causes swarm behavior yes or no??
It depends. I consider "swarmy" bees to be bees that swarm when I don't think they have a good reason or bees that afterswarm themselves to death. This behavior is genetic and using cells from this kind of colony may pass on swarm behavior. But bees that are swarming under the normal circumstances that would cause them to swarm are just being bees.

"For years our bee journals have been printing reams of articles on the question of a non-swarming strain of bees. It has always seemed to me there was a lot of time wasted advocating such an improbable accomplishment, because nature would hardly yield to an arrangement that in itself might destroy the species. If accomplished it would be tantamount to breeding the mating instinct out of domestic animals." --P.C. Chadwick
ABJ, April 1936
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It depends. I consider "swarmy" bees to be bees that swarm when I don't think they have a good reason or bees that afterswarm themselves to death. This behavior is genetic and using cells from this kind of colony may pass on swarm behavior. But bees that are swarming under the normal circumstances that would cause them to swarm are just being bees.

"For years our bee journals have been printing reams of articles on the question of a non-swarming strain of bees. It has always seemed to me there was a lot of time wasted advocating such an improbable accomplishment, because nature would hardly yield to an arrangement that in itself might destroy the species. If accomplished it would be tantamount to breeding the mating instinct out of domestic animals." --P.C. Chadwick
ABJ, April 1936
I agree with you swarmy bees are what i was talking about.
 
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