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I caught a good sized swarm one month ago and installed them in a deep ten frame box. They have built out eight of the ten frames, five with brood and three with honey/pollen. I only added one frame of drawn comb with feed at the time. I was going to add a medium today when I checked on them and found the queen, eggs and young brood. In addition I found three queen cells. One capped. The queen cells are small and on a wacky piece of cut out comb from another hive. What is the best path to take here to prevent swarming? I plant to do whatever is best tomorrow morning. Leave them be to see if they tear down the three queen cells, probably not going to happen...., remove the queen, some nurse bees/brood and a frame of feed into a nuc? Remove the queen cells and some brood/ nurse bees and a frame of feed? Other suggestions? I looked through twenty pages of a "swarm cell" search and only found answers partially answering my questions. Thanks!
 

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Moving either all queen cells or the queen might work okay. But, I'd move the queen and support bees, brood and feed. It's easier and you don't have to worry about having missed a queen cell. Also, if you move the QC's, the bees will probably make swarm cells again. Moving the queen makes them think they have swarmed.
It will set back the original hive, but I assume your honey flow is over anyway.
Swarms occur immediately after the first cell is capped, so removing her ASAP is important.

Hope that helps.
 

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You might want to research supercedure. If the swarm had the old queen they will eventually supercede her which is what most prime swarms do after they feel they have the resources to do so. Moving the queen as heaflaw advises is the best advice!
 

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You might want to research supercedure. If the swarm had the old queen they will eventually supercede her which is what most prime swarms do after they feel they have the resources to do so. Moving the queen as heaflaw advises is the best advice!
They probably being supercedure cells instead of swarm cells is a good point. And swarm cells are usually much more numerous.
 

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The supercedure cells possibility makes sense as there are so few cells but the queen is really hammering out a ton of eggs in a great pattern, she sure seems like she has plenty of miles to me, lol. Also, the cells are near the bottom of the frame I always read supercedure cells were either middle or towards the top? If they are supercedure cells the way I understand it they will kill her in order to replace her correct? So move her out ASAP either way correct?
 

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They don't always kill her right away. Sometimes mother and daughter will lay in the same hive until they dispatch the older queen. I would move her as Heaflaw advised. They say when bees supercede they only build a few queen cells and only in certain places on the comb, I've had them build 28 queen cells before during supercedure. That particular supercedure educated me, reaffirmed bees know what they're doing better than we do. None of the conditions for swarming were present in that hive which I found interesting. They were successful in their supercedure the hive return to normal over wintered well and did not swarm the following spring. It has happened to me too many times to continue to believe what I had heard and read in regards to supercedure. It was a 3 year old queen that had been superceded.
 

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>I will remove the queen, brood and support bees and some feed into a Nuc this afternoon.
That's what I would do.

>I found three queen cells. One capped.
This is telling me you have different aged queen cells, I would be concerned the new virgin could swarm, I would keep the one capped and destroy the others.

Also once you remove the queen give them 5 days and remove all the new cells they will make.
 
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