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Hey everyone,

Sooooooooo I need your help.

I made a lot of mistakes and I pay for it now and I'm totally aware of it.

So here's the deal, I have only 1 brood box at the moment. It's currently EXPLODING of bees. Some suggested to simply add another brood box on the top and others said simply leave it that way, you will have to remove it anyway in like 1 week or 2 so it's kinda useless. So NOW, I have an insane amount of bees in this hive and outside of it. I took off the super too early according to my area by beeing a newbie and not following good recommendations. So here I am with 1 brood box and they have been making swarm cells for the past 3 weeks now (all of them have eggs some of them were closed cells as well) like they REALLY WANT TO GO. No swarm happened so far... But I'm reeealllly afraid it will happen according to what I read on the Internet but again I lack experience and I think I could totally be left with a queenless colony anytime soon since I keep destroying those queen cells. Also I feel like even if they swarm and I keep the queen cells in there, I won't have enough bees to survive Winter here in Quebec/ Canada near Montreal.

When I first saw those swarm cells like 3 weeks ago , I ask local beekeepers what I should do since I had very little extra space for another hive in my backyard and winter is coming quite soon so I thought it was too late to split. Most of them suggested to just destroy them all and it should make it until winter arrive. The thing is, now, I keep destroying all the queen cells at EACH and every single inspection, and TRUST me I inspect every single frame by removing ALL the bees and triple checking both sides of each 10 frames and no queen cells are left behind when I'm done inspecting it.

Sooo according to you guys, what will happen? Am I going to make it until winter is here? Are they going to swarm on me even if they don't have queen cells ready?

Let me know and thank you in advance as always...
 

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Any sign the queen is failing? Can't imagine any other reason they are so intent on making queen cells.

Do you have a spare nuc you can temporarily move the queen into? Pull her out, with enough bees to support her. Then you can spend a week destroying swarm cells and after that they cannot make any more, eggs too old. Then give them some time to quiet down without new eggs to play with, and recombine the hives. Hopefully by then they will decide it is too late to swarm.
 

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Any sign the queen is failing? Can't imagine any other reason they are so intent on making queen cells.

Do you have a spare nuc you can temporarily move the queen into? Pull her out, with enough bees to support her. Then you can spend a week destroying swarm cells and after that they cannot make any more, eggs too old. Then give them some time to quiet down without new eggs to play with, and recombine the hives. Hopefully by then they will decide it is too late to swarm.
This is my strongest colony of my 4 hives I really don'T think the queen is a problem i think it might be the opposite she'S way too fast and solid layer she just have a bad beekeeper at the moment lolll!

I like your idea! Maybe I could try to do so. I do not have any nuc boxes yet... I was planning to build those during this winter...
it sucks because this is my only colony with the strong urge to swarm :(
 

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Most commonly a swarm will leave when the first queen cell is capped if weather permits. This should give some thought to the "possibility" that the bees are attempting to supercede. I had this situation for a while with one of my single deep brood colonies. Many of the cells were up on the middle of the frames besides some on typical swarm cell location.

About the first week in Aug. there were three cells started that appear to have been from a regular horizontal cell. Since the population was huge I decided to let them please themselves and they superceded successfully. Earlier on they might have been intending to swarm. The fact that that queen had already wintered twice played into my flip the coin decision.

It is often not easy to decide whether the main motive is swarming or supercedure.
 

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Fighting a battle you are not likely to win.
A:Move the hive leaving the old queen behind. See what happens and put them back together again.
B:Just not that hard to move a brood box around either, even for just a week or two, so simply adding the box back is a reasonable option as well.
C: Keep on fighting with the hive.
D: anybody with none of the above?
 

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I like AR1's idea. You don't need a nuc box though. Cage and bank the queen with a few attendants. Do you have a cage? I have even done it with a queen clip. You could make or borrow one perhaps.
Give them candy,marshmallow or a drop of sugar water and plain water daily. J
 

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AR1's plan plus option A of Saltybee.

Pull the queen and her frame. Leave it in a box at the original location. Move the other box and bees 10' (3M to my Canadian friends) or so away. From here on do as AR1 laid out and it should be fine.
 

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As with so many things, location matters. Here in California there is still time to split and make lots of changes and still let them build up before overwintering. How long until winter really sets in there?
If you were closer my advice would be to send a frame with swarm cells to me and I will take care of the "problem" for you.:D

If you have boxes I would probably treat it as a split. Try to move Queen, any frames with brood that don't have swarm cells and some frames of honey and as many workers as possible to a new box. Some workers will return to the original box so you end up with fewer in the new box than you start with, but still hopefully enough since your description sounds like you have a good population. If you have drawn frames to fill out the new and old boxes that will be better. Empty frames that are drawn are space to expand into. Frames that are not drawn are space to expand in your mind, but not so much to the bees. They help in the long run but NOT if your goal is to stop swarming.

You will be looking for the queen as you do this, so you will know if she is gone or not. If you don't find her then you will want to distribute the swarm cells in both or better yet modify plan to simply expand the space in the one hive because the problem is not what you were thinking but rather you lost your queen and those are emergency cells.
Assuming you find and move queen, it is up to you whether you cull the swarm cells in the old hive or let them take care of it themselves.
 

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If you have a weaker colony in your apiary that you'd like to build up, I suggest you exchange their locations.

The strong colony's field force with augment the weaker, and the weaker colony's field force will give the strong some breathing space.

Continue to cut the queen cells. It's getting now to the point where the drones are being evicted. A virgin may find difficulty mating.

If the strong colony (now in the weaker location) still seems to be boiling with bees, place a medium super with empty frames below the brood nest. It will provide clustering space for the bees, but not allow for the brood to chill as the nights are getting colder.

It may be that the queen will lay in the lower chamber. That shouldn't be an issue because eggs laid today will be winter bees emerging in early october. By God's grace the upper chamber will begin to be filled with sealed honey and provide reserve for the colony overwinter.
 
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