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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had mixed success with trying to save bees that have suffered from hypothermia. On a warm day, if a one of my hives is not flying, I will check on them. Often find a very small cluster, with a queen, that appears dead. Put in nuc and bring into house. Sometimes, after warming up, they appear fine. I keep the nuc indoors with the frames of honey they were on, and put a screened inner cover on the nuc under the outer cover, so I can check on them. Often within a week, they are all dead.

Also, I rescue bees that have fallen in snow on a warm day, I have warmed them up in the house. Often, I put them into a weak indoor nuc. Most die within a few days.

Does anyone know if bees that have suffered from hypothermia are damaged and are going to die regardless of what we do?

Thank you for any insights you can give me.
 

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well I picked up a nuc I thought was dead, put it in the front seat of the truck, they came back to life, caught the queen and put her in a queenless hive, and she laid fine until the next year. On the other hand a few years ago we had a shipment of queens get sent by truck instead of overnight air, temps were below freezing. when I picked them up they all appeared dead, fed them some honey, put them near the heater, put them in nucs, about 50% never laid or were superceded in short order, and none of them were still around the next spring. so I guess it depends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you wildbranch2007 for your reply. Very helpful.

If anyone else can share your experience, I would love to hear about it. Thank you.
 
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