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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am senior high school student enrolled in a Scientific Research class in my High School. I am doing a project on "The effect of pesticides inside/outside a bee hive and the role it may play in colony collapse". I would appreciate your input to the following questions.

1. How many bee hives do you have?

2. Within a 2 mile radius of each hive, have there been plants exposed to any type of pesticides?
a. If so do you know what type of pesticide?
b. Of the hives within the 2 mile radius of known pesticide use, have you experienced a colony collapse?
c. Did you notice a change in honey production?

3. In the last two years have you treated for Varroa mites?
a. After treatment, did you notice a colony collapse?
b. After treatment, did you notice a change in honey production?
i. What percent of increase or decrease did you experience?

4. What product did you use to treat for Varroa mites, if treated?

5. Are any of your hives within a 2 mile radius of an agriculture field?
a. If yes did you experience a colony collapse?
b. Did you notice a change in honey production?


Multiple Choice Question
6. What was the climate of your region during the spring and summer of 2013?
a. Normal
b. Drought
c. Highly Wet
d. Highly Variable
You may also email me at [email protected]. Thank you for your assistance
 

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Good point, RHF. We had a talk from a Bayer bee researcher lately who is persnickety about the definition of CCD. In his view he sees lots of dead hives, but their symptoms can be clearly diagnosed. In his view, these clear diagnoses are not CCD.

Here's the Bayer party line (and don't pile up on me, 'cause I'm just agreeing that one must be clear in the survey questions)

http://www.cropscience.bayer.com/en...erviewId=01BC0BC0-950A-4B79-8643-B64CB395744E
" When colonies collapse, they are abandoned within a short period of time by the adult bees, which leave their hives to die. The few bees remaining behind have revealed an unusual spectrum of bacterial and viral infections, parasite infestation and fungal diseases. For this phenomenon US bee researchers have coined the term Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD).

Only about 26 percent of the cases of higher bee mortality reported in the USA in 2009 are connected with this phenomenon. In 2009, beekeepers ranked CCD only in eighth place among the suspected causes of bee deaths, with pesticides well behind in ninth place. CCD occurred very much less frequently in the winter of 2008/09 than in the years before."

Otherwise I like this survey as a high-school project. I would participate but we're still waiting on our first bees.
 

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1. How many bee hives do you have? 3
2. Within a 2 mile radius of each hive, have there been plants exposed to any type of pesticides? Yes
a. If so do you know what type of pesticide? Yes, to some extent (field crops with typical pesticides) and no (homeowners with kitchen gardens and varying tolerances for bugs.)
b. Of the hives within the 2 mile radius of known pesticide use, have you experienced a colony collapse? Yes, but that was a long-standing unmanaged set of colonies that lived in my barns and disappeared in early 2013.
c. Did you notice a change in honey production? I don't manage my bees for honey production and the former colony of bees was left to its own devices for two decades. They disappeared with hundreds of pounds of honey left behind in the walls.

3. In the last two years have you treated for Varroa mites? Yes.
a. After treatment, did you notice a colony collapse? No, both of the hives I treated are still alive today..
b. After treatment, did you notice a change in honey production? Again, my bees are not kept as honey producers, but more critically my current hives are in their first year and most people would have left them all their honey anyway. I treated during the golden rod flow in late Sept.
i. What percent of increase or decrease did you experience? n/a

(NOTE - IS SOMETHING MISSING HERE?? The lettered sequence went from "b" to "i"?

4. What product did you use to treat for Varroa mites, if treated? Apiguard

5. Are any of your hives within a 2 mile radius of an agriculture field? Yes
a. If yes did you experience a colony collapse? See above answer regarding bees which died in 2013
b. Did you notice a change in honey production? Again, see above comment about the unmanaged bees.

Multiple Choice Question
6. What was the climate of your region during the spring and summer of 2013?
a. Normal
b. Drought
c. Highly Wet
d. Highly Variable

Spring 2013 extremely wet in May and early June; after that very normal. Perhaps more important, though, at least for the disappeared, collapsed colony was that the summer of 2012 was extraordinarily hot and dry, affecting late season nectar and pollen flow, which may have weakened the colonies. But I have no idea what happened to them - they just vanished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe "colony collapse" isn't the right term. I want to know if, as a result of pesticide treatment or varrora treatment if your hives experienced a high mortality rate. Higher than normal.
 

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1. How many bee hives do you have? 21

2. Within a 2 mile radius of each hive, have there been plants exposed to any type of pesticides? yes
a. If so do you know what type of pesticide? Prevathon, Aztec, and Neonics among others, non-pesticide Roundup and 2,4-D
b. Of the hives within the 2 mile radius of known pesticide use, have you experienced a colony collapse? no
c. Did you notice a change in honey production? Yes but doubtful it was caused exclusively by pesticides/herbicides

3. In the last two years have you treated for Varroa mites? Yes
a. After treatment, did you notice a colony collapse? No
b. After treatment, did you notice a change in honey production? No
i. What percent of increase or decrease did you experience? N/A

4. What product did you use to treat for Varroa mites, if treated? Oxalic Acid on 5 hives

5. Are any of your hives within a 2 mile radius of an agriculture field? Yes, they are on a farm surrounded by other farms
a. If yes did you experience a colony collapse? No
b. Did you notice a change in honey production? No


Multiple Choice Question
6. What was the climate of your region during the spring and summer of 2013?

b. Severe drought with floods in late fall
 

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Maybe "colony collapse" isn't the right term. I want to know if, as a result of pesticide treatment or varrora treatment if your hives experienced a high mortality rate. Higher than normal.
Go with that. Hive mortality or distress. There seem to actually be a few in the forum who would agree with the Bayer guy that CCD is rare now. In any case, the Bayer guy would say that if insecticides are misused and kill a colony, that's not CCD. (And he'd say he almost never sees it, of course.) This is not to say that there is not a lot of colony death happening, and it looks like you want to help find out why.
 

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There are certainly other researchers (I know of at least one at Penn State) that say CCD is not very prevalent anymore. The Bayer guy is actually correct, that description is CCD. CCD is a queen right hive with almost no workers left, just some nurse bees and a queen, in a very short period of time. Science itself is persnickety that way. Definitions of a condition must be narrow and succinct if one is to study that condition properly. If a hive goes queenless, this is not CCD. If a hive is overwhelmed by mites and simply dwindles over time, this is not CCD. If a hive goes into a cold winter with high mite/viral loads and then dies, this is not CCD.
 

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To guarantee an A grade on this project, also make sure to not make major spelling mistakes in the titles of your SURVEYS.
 

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1. How many bee hives do you have?
200

2. Within a 2 mile radius of each hive, have there been plants exposed to any type of pesticides?
Yes

a. If so do you know what type of pesticide?
No. Probably whatever is typical for corn, soybeans and alfalfa. Two of them are near pumpkins so probably whatever they use a well at those locations.

b. Of the hives within the 2 mile radius of known pesticide use, have you experienced a colony collapse?
No. In the last 15 years in this area I've had one bad pesticide hit where many of the hives lost a lot of bees, and some of the hives lost a huge number of bees. All the colonies survived anyway. That was more than a decade ago.

c. Did you notice a change in honey production?
Not sure how this relates. If you mean after the pesticide kill, of course. I have not had a collapse.

3. In the last two years have you treated for Varroa mites?
No. In the last 10 years I have not treated for Varroa mites in any of my hives. Some of the hives have not been treated for the last 12 years.

a. After treatment, did you notice a colony collapse?
N/A

b. After treatment, did you notice a change in honey production?
N/A

i. What percent of increase or decrease did you experience?
Increase what? Honey production after treating? N/A

4. What product did you use to treat for Varroa mites, if treated?
N/A

5. Are any of your hives within a 2 mile radius of an agriculture field?
All of my hives are within 2 miles of conventional corn, soybeans and alfalfa. Two of my yards are also near pumpkins.

a. If yes did you experience a colony collapse?
No

b. Did you notice a change in honey production?
Change compared to what? They have always been next to agricultural fields since I've had them.

Multiple Choice Question
6. What was the climate of your region during the spring and summer of 2013?
b. Drought
d. Highly variable
 
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