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Installed a package of bees, including queen on 5/7 on dead out frames from the winter. Inspection today and noticed a queen cell toward the bottom half of a frame; not on the bottom of frame. The queen cell was sealed. And, I saw that I still have my marked queen. The hive may have been a little crowded. I added another brood box. Any thoughts on whether I should tear down the sealed queen cell?

Thanks,
Jim
 

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make a nuc ? we are in a similar climate im assuming and u could possibly make a nuc by pulling 2 frames. one being brood and one being stores of honey,nectar and pollen. put the queen in the nuc as well. let them draw out that queen cell. just a thought which i only had because u said they seemed a little crowded.
 

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According to beekeeping literature, supercedure attempts are not uncommon with new packages. It is perceived that an imbalance in the population of foragers/nurse bees typically occurs. Before the new queen's brood begin to emerge, the older package bees begin to dwindle. The unbalanced population is thought to be the logical contributing factor. The new queen is perceived to be the cause of an imbalance that is inherent to the package install, and the colony decides she must be superceded.

According to queen rearing literature, capped queen cells are very delicate during most of their development. Any jarring of the capped cell, especially in any position other than the vertical may lead to pupae deformities & resulting in a queen that has less of a chance of getting properly mated. With care, the cell can be placed in a nuc, over the package, the old queen left below, and the chances of having one or both survive and prosper increased. The original package might get back down to business once the supercedure cell is removed, as the imbalance may have begun to right itself within the time that the cell has begun developing.

Moving the cell up provides some insurance that IF the lower unit fails AND the supercedure cell hatches and gets mated, the colony might still be salvaged by re-uniting. Destroying the supercedure cell might also work, so long as the original queen is still doing her job.

If you are new to beekeeping, moving the cell up is a wonderful opportunity to see your bees try to produce a new queen, with minimal effort on your part, and a bit of insurance for your new package if something else goes wrong.
 

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Good idea also Colobee. Queen cells are fragile but not as fragile as books claim. I've handle thousands, after a while you get a feel for handling them. The biggest concern is bumping and jarring them, that's where you run into problems.
 

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Thank you, but it really wasn't my idea. Most of what I've tried has either already been written about, or is some slight adaptation thereof. Simulating supercedure is a well known practice which is likely still commonly used.

It has sometimes worked for me. I would try it again under similar circumstances. Having the new queen fail to mate properly is, in my experience, the greatest risk/drawback. Literature suggests that supercedure is a great opportunity to try to capitalize on. This is a cell/potential queen that the bees have chosen to head the colony, rather than divide it. Therefore it is logically argued that supercedure queen cells receive much more attention than the average swarm queen, and are much more likely to develop into superior queens.
 
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