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Could ya'll tell me what to expect shortly after they have superceded? I recently posted in another post asking about queen cells thinking they were swarm cells and thanks to the advice I got from here, I learned they were supercedure and I let them take care of their own business. I inspected this hive yesterday frame by frame and found the supercedure cells had hatched but I found no larvae, a good amount of bees, lots of honey and pollen, and a queen that appears to me to be young. She is smaller than the queens in my other hives and she moved a little faster, almost looking hyper some. Is this normal? Has she not mated yet? I noticed plenty of drones also. Thanks
 

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I guess what worries me was not seeing any brood. I am assuming they all hatched and everything is ok because the hive has quite a few bees in it. Several weeks ago there was plenty of capped brood and some larvae. The bees seemed jittery like they were on speed but were very nice and not testy. They have filled and have started capping almost 10 frames in a deep so I am happy with that.
 

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She will get mated and be plump and fat....youll see a noticable difference in her. If not, take a picture and check her out in about 4-7 days. Its noticable to me at that point.
 

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I guess what worries me was not seeing any brood. .
You deserve a thorough answer. This process took me a few years to understand. Most importantly, you have to understand what we like to call the queen math. 16 days from egg to emergence. A few days to "harden off" then several days to mate (remember she mates multiple times) and a few more days hanging out int he hive before laying, brings it to approximately 4 weeks from egg to new laying queen - and this is all if the stars align and no bird eats her on a mating flight, there are not 6 weeks of rain (as there were in many places last year) etc.

So you will not see any larvae or eggs for a while. That is to be expected. Your original queen stopped laying a few days before she left (if she swarmed). While the new queen stuff is going on, the last brood your original queen laid before leaving will hatch out, and ultimately all you will see is a hive with no brood at all, and increasingly filling up with nectar until one glorious day when you know to look in there and find your new mated queen happily laying and all is well with the world.

This time line works when thinking about hives that swarmed. However, if a queen is actually superseded, then the timing may be a bit different depending on when the original queen was killed, died, if she harmed and unable to lay, etc. The important thing to remember is how long it takes a new queen to be made, mated, and ready to lay, and not immediately freak out when your hive is broodless and eggless- especially if you see a queen cell in there. Since you actually saw a virgin queen, you sound like you are well on the way. Leave that virgin queen alone for at least a week and then tell us what you see. Best of luck!

PS- See May 2010 issue of Bee Culture for 2 articles talking about this same queen math.
 

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Thanks Winevines. That is the answer I was wanting and was what I was thinking while rolling all the possibilities around in my head. I appreciate it more than you know.
 

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Thanks Winevines. That is the answer I was wanting and was what I was thinking while rolling all the possibilities around in my head. I appreciate it more than you know.
I am so glad to be able to help someone, as many before have helped me get to the level of understanding I have now, some on this list. It is well worth the price of a year of digital version of Bee Culture for these two articles alone. Both have good visuals about queen math. Most other books should also describe this, but some are more clear than others.
 

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http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm

Odds are there is a queen. If you are still concerned, (I will repeat myself again. :) )there are few solutions as universal in their application and their success than adding a frame of open brood every week for three weeks. It is a virtual panecea for any queen issues. It gives the bees the pheromones to suppress laying workers. It gives them more workers coming in during a period where there is no laying queen. It does not interfere if there is a virgin queen. It gives them the resources to rear a queen. It is virtually foolproof and does not require finding a queen or seeing eggs. If you have any issue with queenrightness, no brood, worried that there is no queen, this is the simple solution that reuires no worrying, no waiting, no hoping. You just give them what they need to resolve the situation. If you have any doubts about the queenrightness of a hive, give them some open brood and sleep well. Repeat once a week for two more weeks if you still aren't sure. By then things will be fine.
 
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