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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought a nuc that is being re-queened last week. Today, I saw that the queen cage is empty and I couldn't find the queen. I saw 3 supercedure cells. I am suspecting that the queen was rejected. My questions is:

1. Should I just re-queen the hive using the supercedure cell or should I buy a queen? Most of the queens available are being shipped May 4th (at least the queen breed I was looking for) which is 2 weeks. I have read that it takes 24-30 days before the supercedure queen to start laying eggs.

Please help. I am not sure what to do. I don't want to lose the hive.
 

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Contact the nuc supplier. Nucs shouldn't ship with a caged queen. The queens should be free and laying happily before you pick it up.

Sounds like the colony started drawing emergency cells before the queen was accepted. She could be in there laying, just look for eggs. If you see eggs knock down all the cells and you should be fine. I've requeened hives that often draw cells. More than often they tear them down after the queen gets laying.

If you truly are queenless then still contact the supplier and get a replacement. Knock down the cells before adding another queen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the reply. I checked the hive the next day and found the queen, good thing she is marked. Now the only thing is that I have seen 3 supersedure cells despite having a new laying queen, :(.
 

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I would contact the supplier and let them know what is going on.

Are you seeing any signs that the queen is laying right? A nuc should not be needing a new queen this soon. The nuc should be used to the queen by the time you recieve it.

Where are you located?

If the nuc is strong and you have the equipment I would be tempted to try to split the queen and a frame into a new box (if it is warm enough) and see what they do.

Depending on where you are located also depends on if you want to allow a hive to supersede, or stop it. If you are in an area with a lot of african genetics you may want to stop a supersede so you don't end up with a mean hive.
 

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Are you sure they are "cells" and not "cups"? Cells have an egg in them and royal jelly, a milky liquid. Cups are just the wax "peanut" looking drawn cell. They will often make cells and never use them. Wait. No reason to panic. Are you sure you got a nuc and not a package? Nucs do not come with caged queens. J
 

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Nucs do not come with caged queens. J
At least they shouldn't. Some suppliers ship them caged which likely means she was introduced when the nuc was made. Not really the best way to do it, but happens.

And agreed. Cups are nothing to really worry about but when you're new and not sure what is what, it doesn't hurt to just notch them out with the hive tool to be safe. As you gain experience you'll be able to tell what is a cup and what is a cell - a cell having an egg and a cup not.
 

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Mtnmyke, They may be sold as a nucleus colony, but if the queen is caged, it is not. People are getting ripped off, big time. J
 
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