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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here is the problem:

I have a top bar hive that is queenless and has gone laying worker.

I also have a new hive from a package that after 2 weeks, is queenless as there are no eggs -- however, there are 3 supercedure cells -- one is quite large. So, the queen had to lay at least of few eggs before she disappeared.

My solution:

I am going to make a Nuc by pulling the frame with the supercedure cells as well as a few frames with capped brood and some uncapped, as well as a frame of honey and pollen and place them in a nuc.

I am going to place the nuc where the top bar hive was and then shake out the top bar hive and let the bees fly home -- their new home is now the nuc. This will increase the population of the nuc.

My hope, is that they will populate the nuc and raise a queen on their own.

Anyone done this and what are the chances of this working?

Thanks.
 

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Can you just swap the hives around? I'd be tempted to leave the pkg colony alone (other than gently moving it) and hope the SQC takes. Your chances are fair.
 

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>I have a top bar hive that is queenless and has gone laying worker.
> I also have a new hive from a package that after 2 weeks, is queenless as there are no eggs -- however, there are 3 supercedure cells -- one is quite large. So, the queen had to lay at least of few eggs before she disappeared.

So the supersedure cells are in a different hive from the laying workers? I ask, because laying worker hives often build queen cells but they usually contain drone larvae. Assuming that these are indeed queen cells, one would be a good bet to give to the laying worker hive. It's not a sure thing but a fair chance of acceptance.

>I am going to make a Nuc by pulling the frame with the supercedure cells as well as a few frames with capped brood and some uncapped, as well as a frame of honey and pollen and place them in a nuc.
>I am going to place the nuc where the top bar hive was and then shake out the top bar hive and let the bees fly home -- their new home is now the nuc. This will increase the population of the nuc.

No particular gain to shaking them out if you are going to let them fly right back to the same place.
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfallacies.htm#shakingout

>My hope, is that they will populate the nuc and raise a queen on their own.

Are they capped queen cells? If so the queen has already been "raised" you just have to keep them from tearing down the cell.

>Anyone done this and what are the chances of this working?

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslayingworkers.htm
 

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I haven't had to deal with many laying worker colonies, but I recall trying most of the recommended "cures". My worst case success ended by uniting under a strong colony.They dwindle so quickly - not worth a lot of (wasted) effort in my experience. I'd rather use my time, queens, nucs, etc. on something with a better track record of success. Maybe unite a swarm on top - if you have too many (what's that?)
 
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