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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay ... here is the background and I need advice.
Hived my first pkg on April 14. First brief inspection after 4 days to check on queen showed
all was well. Girls were drawing out comb like crazy.

Second inspection looked good. Queen active, capped brood and lots of larva in cells.
Feeding the bees and they were going through the syrup like crazy. All looked well.

Everything appeared to be progressing fine. Lots of pollen being brought in.
When the bees had 7 of the 10 frames drawn out in the lower deep I added an
additional deep. All new foundation. SO to help with starting them drawing out
comb in the new box I moved one frame of brood from lower to upper.

Now we come to my latest inspection. Top deep had good activity, didn't see any
eggs but larva in cells and the queen had moved up into this upper box. 4-5 frames
are now drawn out. I see frames of stored syrup, some capped.

Now I go into the lower brood box. I see capped brood but not much new activity.
Plenty on nurse bees. Then I spot a single supersedure cell about middle of one of
the center frames !

Did I goof by putting a new box on too soon? Are the bees in the lower box
thinking the queen has abandoned them ? I did see larva in various stages
so the queen was laying recently, but not a lot. I've never been able to spot
eggs so can't say if she is laying less.

At a loss as to what to do. Move all the brood and larva frames, along with
the queen back into the lower box ?
Should I leave the supersedure cell and let it produce a new queen ?
Just wondering if I may have done something to prompt this action.

Thanks!
 

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From another similar post:

From "The Hive and the Honeybee" - Management of package bees :

"There comes a critical time in the progress of the package colony, usually about 3 weeks after it is hived when the new brood produced from the eggs of the queen reached a relatively high point in proportion to the number of adult bees. Many of the (package bees) will have died, and no young bees will have emerged. It is often at this time that supersedure ... occurs..., probably because the population is out of balance. This can largely be overcome by giving the package colony a comb of emerging brood and bees from a healthy colony, placing this comb next to the brood combs in the package colony. This should be done about two weeks after the package is installed; colonies so treated will gain surprisingly in strength."

I do this all the time. Sprinkling a little syrup on both the new frame of brood, and across the top of the package colony brood frames greatly enhances the introduction. "Surprisingly" is an understatement, in my experience.

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I'd be tempted to try to split out the supercedure cell into a baby nuc, as it isn't likely to be as good as your mail order queen - assuming it (SQ) gets mated.
 

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Don't worry, the worst you'll likely end up with is a hive! If you have a double screen board, you could make up a split right on top of your current hive (You can make one by just covering both sides of an inner hole with screen). The "split" will benefit from the warmth of the lower colony while the queen hatches out and tries to mate. If your lower then prospers , you can decide what to do with the SCQ later (IF she gets mated). The lower unit, being deprived of it's SC cell, MIGHT get back to business. It's all a population balance thing, and now some days have passed...
 

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Running a single hive is always a risk. Modification of the above is to use a queen excluder rather the the double screen board. Workers will service the brood as needed through the excluder. You have a good chance of ending up with two queens and very little chanceof none. Give the top an upper entrance, flipped or offset inner cover will work fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Appreciate the replies. Sounds like the way to go. I don't have a queen excluder but I can figure
something out with screening an inner cover.
 
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