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Discussion Starter #1
So I am in my 8 frame hive with 2 medium boxes on it. My mentor is with me because I have yet to find the queen in either hive. We are finding eggs, brood and capped honey in good amounts. I found a queen cell, capped, on the outside edge of one frame, on the edge of the foundation, about halfway up. He announces I don't need her and ripps it off before I can say stop! :doh:
Was this a supercedure cell? Should he have left it? will they build another?
The frames were all pretty full and I added a 3rd box. It only took them 3 weeks to build out the second box. I have kept 1:1 on them since installing them. This is the first time they have sucked down the syrup really fast.
meridith
 

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Your mentor was there, so he should have a better idea than what we can tell you. He saw.
However, if they make another cell, then the bees know something you do not. Usually, bees that make one queen cell on the face of the frame, and usually quite long, know the queen is not up to snuff.
This can happen if:
- the existing queen came from a nuc from a beekeeper. Most beekeepers give the older queen in the nucs. That way they keep a younger queen in their hives
- the queen in your hive was not mated properly and did not mate with enough drones. This would cause her to not have enough pheremones and a shorter life span.
-queen is starting to lay alot of drones
there are other reasons, but those are the ones that come to mind right now. Keep an eye on your hive and check back in a week or so and see what is happening. Mark on your calender or in you book you saw eggs and a supercedure cell.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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I would have left it. Destroying queen cells is the most effecient way I know of to end up queenless.... not that I am recommending it, but killing the actual queen is less likely to... as then they will just raise one, but if they are superseding odds are the queen is failing and when she does there will be no replacement...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Mike, this is what I am worrying about. It was a huge cell. There was also about 10 drone cells along the bottom of the frame, which he also tore out. We didn't go into the bottom box. I think I may go back and look at it tomorrow just to see what is happening.
There were eggs and larva. If they build up another queen cell, I will leave it. Actually, i guess it is When they build another one.
Meridith
 

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My first couple years I very rarely spied the queen. No big deal. As long as there was a good brood pattern, I knew the queen was doing her job.

As for the queen cell, I would have left it alone. As others have said, the bees usually know better what they need to do than we do.
 

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We didn't go into the bottom box.
Quite often, when my bees start making supercedure cells, they make a number of them.
I think I may go back and look at it tomorrow just to see what is happening.
I wouldn't be surprised if you find more in the bottom box. I'll echo Michael Bush. Cutting queen cells increases the risk of making your hive queenless. Bees have spent eons perfecting the process....and while it isn't actually perfect, human intervention doesn't improve it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Went back in my hive today. I found what I think were three more supercedure calls. They weren't capped or as nice as the one my mentor ripped out. I left them alone. Still have plenty if capped brood and a good number of drone brood.
When the queen hatches, does she breed with the drones from her hive or is it with others she finds? I don't know of any other beeks near me. How long after shee hatches before I can expect to see eggs?
meridith
 

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>When the queen hatches, does she breed with the drones from her hive or is it with others she finds?

Whatever she finds, but her instincts and the drones' instincts are different so the odds favor her finding other drones. The drones from her hive will typically not go more than 1/2 mile to a DCA (Drone congregation area) and she typically will go about 2 miles. But she may go as much as seven and they may go more as well and she may be even less. It's just a question of odds. No gaurantees.

> I don't know of any other beeks near me.

Bees are everywhere. The bees find the DCAs.

> How long after shee hatches before I can expect to see eggs?

Two weeks would be typical. Between one and three weeks.
 
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