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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have a couple hundred boxes to put together, a mix of deeps and mediums. I glue with titebond 3 and staple. I put the first dozen together by gluing, then straighten on a square, then clamp them four ways and put a couple staples in. Release the clamps, check square and adjust as needed, and finally put the rest of the staples in. Seemed really slow.. I was wondering if anyone has any shortcuts.. I am imagining two vises (is that a word?) working in opposite directions clamping and getting square while leaving room to staple.. Or maybe there are better clamps or??

Thanks
Jake
 

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I have a flat piece of 3/4 plywood with two fences glued and screwed to it that are square to each other. The fences are a double sandwich of 3/4 plywood to make a 1-1/2 high fence to clamp against. I butt a box corner into the fences and apply clamps to the bottom portion of the box and the outside of the fence to hold the box tight to the square fence. I clamp the top of the box normally.

You only need to square one corner. The other corners will take care of themselves once the joints are pulled tight. You can get corner clamps that will hold the corner square but you'll have to pull the corner tight together first.

For a couple of hundred boxes you might want to build up a clamping jig, especially if you think you'll do it again. Do you have a friend who is a welder?

edit: I found this on Youtube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHoe_LyAKU4
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks

JConnolly, that looks sweet! I'm surprised he isn't even gluing them? Even after glue and with box joints, that would be way faster.. Might have to do a little digging.

elmer_fud, Those look like something I might more easily source.
 

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Build a jig. I do all my stapling at once. Then check for square. If bad a clamp to pull it to where it needs to be. I use the steel one that rotates with a air cylinder to hold it in place.
 

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If you have half the staples in and bang them down on the corners to square them, when you put the Next staple in, I would assure you that it will be square. I did mine initially using #7 common nails in pre-drilled holes.

NB Concept description of rubbed glue joint follows. (You don't have to be using hide glue, white or yellow glue PVA will rub just as well)
If you have never made a rubbed glue joint before you should try it. I find I can do an angled scarf joint without even using a clamp some days. Take two pieces of wood, add glue and place them together like you planned on clamping them. But instead slide them 1/4-1/2 inch in all 8 directions of the compass. Notice how it gets more difficult as you go. After a few seconds worth of doing this you can pull it into a perfect direction and sit it down and let it cure without even a clamp.
END concept description

1. Glue - as the assembly process slides the fingers together it is creating a rubbed joint that will not move easily.
2. Nailing in one direction (or stapling) This further tightens the glue joint, rubbing it even tighter, causing the glue to bind even tighter.
3. Bang that corner into 90° you are working the glue joint, and you already have quite a few mechanical fasteners, supporting in 1 direction.
4. Staple and measure for square. If not bang some more. But I would guess it is.
5. Add the rest of your staples, and just check for square after each side.

The UI is all kind of different today, can't figure how to show you a picture, but if I could, you would see that they are balls-on square. Here is a link to the google pictures
https://photos.app.goo.gl/eMJwZiRdVRzNvBzL7
https://photos.app.goo.gl/FpqHkKpkwDLWMQqe6
Hopefully they come through. But the only diff was I didn't use staples, I used #7 Common nails.
 
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