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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering what could be expected from queens raised/mated in late June/July. How poor could they be?

I have a few frames with q-cells and I'm wondering if it's worth placing them in the queen castle and eventually make up a few nucs.

Or would it be better to spend the time sitting in the shade with an ice tea?
 

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The resulting queens should be just as good physically as early spring queens and potentially better mated. I'm planning to graft for over winter nuc making in the next week or so.
 

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If they are being made from poor stock that was mated to poor stock you could have some really poor queens.:lookout:
 

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These ought to be high quality queens.

Dr. Farrar at the U of Wisconsin (many, many years ago) said that queens raised when nectar and pollen are plentiful will be exceptionally good queens. Even queens of questionable genetic background will excel when fed and mated during the prime floral season.

He added that queens raised under ideal situations (like in the summer) would be better than queens of high genetic pedigrees raised under more stressful situations like early season cold spells and fewer drone numbers for mating.

I think you've got some good potential queens.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
These ought to be high quality queens.

Dr. Farrar at the U of Wisconsin (many, many years ago) said that queens raised when nectar and pollen are plentiful will be exceptionally good queens. Even queens of questionable genetic background will excel when fed and mated during the prime floral season.
Grant,

I hope you're right, but we are on the downside of the flow and it has gotten very dry...
The farm, where these bees are, is surrounded by woods which have a lot of Black Locust trees in them. I did a little bee-lining last year, and at least half of the bees I caught headed for the woods when released, so I'm hoping that there are some local ferals.

I believe that the nearest maintained colonies may be three or more miles away but I need to check into that. I'd like to think that the queens would be mating with something more interesting than chemical treated Italians...

The queen-mother is a Charlie Harper Russian.
 

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I have 3 new queens from splits. Just checked on them and their patterns are very very tight and large. They are laying frames....literal frames...and I KNOW we are in a dearth as we speak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll start assembling some more boxes and accessories for some five frame nucs. I asked about feeding a pollen-sub to new nucs/colonies in another thread, but I'll ask again. Pollen intake is way down and I'm thinking I'd rather give my smaller colonies a boost now so they'll be on their own in the fall.

If feeding some pollen sub/sup now is a good idea what product do you recommend? A dry product shipped from Brushy Mt would be the cheapest for me. If ingredients were cheap enough and available I'd mix my own but I'm concerned with the freshness.

Any suggestions?
 

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You want queens that have been well fed while they were developing.

If you don't have a flow going, feed the bees to make sure the queens are well fed.

Does the hive have enough bees to take care of queen cells? If your hive is dwindling down to nothing and trying to supercede as a last chance measure, queens raised in weak hives may not be fed well.

Normally, summer queens are fed well and mated well. Queens are usually their best in their second year, so next year these queens should be peaking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Does the hive have enough bees to take care of queen cells? If your hive is dwindling down to nothing and trying to supercede as a last chance measure, queens raised in weak hives may not be fed well.
Yes, there's a lot of bees.. I moved a box with the queen to another stand to have the colony finish filling/capping some honey, and to try to have them raise a queen. I have cells on at least three frames.

I have a second hive that I might remove the queen from and swap out the young, open Carni brood with some Russian eggs and tiny larvae to try for a second set of q-cells.
 

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The quality of queens is most dependant on the food supply. Drones are helpful but drones also follow the food supply. When there is plenty of food there are usually plenty of drones. When there is a dearth there are few drones...
 

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Without trying to sound like a cheerleader... Raising a few queens in your nuc's is fun, and if the bees have already made the queen cell and there's a well grown larva in it most of the work is already done. I love seeing a brand new queen wandering around. In the confines of a nuc she is so much easier to find. Plus, I think Mr. Bush says it, or he quotes something like this "there are not many problems that can't be solved with a nuc".
It is also economical. Should you develop queen problems in another hive you are not going to hive to spend $20-30 for a new queen, or drive to get one.
Go for it. Adrian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Update:

Before inspecting the frames in my queen castle, I checked the queenless hive that I had given more eggs and larva to. I was surprised that not a single cell had been built, and I'm wondering if there is a young queen that may have emerged before I arrived last week.

The Queen Castle:

I didn't come across any queens in two of the three compartments, but in the third there was a queen. I was really surprised at how dark she was. She was nearly black.

From what I've seen it's time to get ready for the Fall...
 
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