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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a few weeks of mild weather, 40s to 60s, it's supposed to suddenly get down into the low thirties and even the high twenties on one night. I'm a little concerned. Any suggestions?
 

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Don't put the comforter away just yet. It's been snowing here for the last 2 hours. Nothing you're going to do except have a smile on your face the next warm sunny day and bees are out flying again!
 

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going on what I saw in the hives today, the queen really fired up the egg laying the last few day's, though the bees were out foraging(nothing to be found), I expect that brood will get chilled over the next few days.
 

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it's supposed to suddenly get down into the low thirties and even the high twenties on one night.
It's supposed to be 28 here Wed morning in balmy Alabamy. We've had a few days recently above 80 degrees. Stupid winter weather.......
 

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yeah tell me about it. we had snow all day after a few solid weeks (finally) of nice weather. i even made some nucs because they picked up soo well. THIS SUCKS !!!!!

i really hope everyone pulls through this dumb winter leftover. freakin drag :(
 

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I hear you coondoger....I installed packages a little more than a week ago and today we had a high of 27 :( and tomarrow through thursday is supposed to be highs in the low 30s. I guess they'll just go into a winter cluster to stay warm to keep the eggs and brood alive,,,,Im mainly concerned about the bees as the brood can be replaced by a healthy hive....we are supposed to be back into the 40s/50s by the weekend then 60s next week....Just have to surrvive the next few days....Good luck ALL.

==McBee7==
 

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I don't think you have much to worry about as far as the bees go. They will be find they should be at a state where this little cold splash will not even be an inconvenience to them.
 

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If they have stores they will be fine. You may lose some brood to chilling, but it shouldn't be that much.

I learned last year to wait to do splits until the blackberries bloom -- lost one to bad weather right after the split.

It is normal this time of year for a cold blast to follow some days of very warm weather, which is why I don't have anything planted in the garden yet. No reason to watch my tomatoes freeze.

Peter
 

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I have 5 frame mating nucs going right now. The queens should have just emerged. Most are not very well stocked with bees. Yes, I know I should have waited.

What should I do? Wrap with towels? Cover the top and bottom screens with plywood?
 

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I have a split I made 2 1/2 weeks ago and supplied with a new queen - they are probably at their low point right about now and when I checked them 4 days ago there was a lot of uncapped brood and eggs - we expect temps in about the mid to upper 30's- I am seriously thinking about screening their entrance for a day or two and bringing them into the house. Is there any reason not to do that?
 

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I have 5 frame mating nucs going right now. The queens should have just emerged. Most are not very well stocked with bees. Yes, I know I should have waited.

What should I do? Wrap with towels? Cover the top and bottom screens with plywood?
I always cover my hives bottom screens with ply or cardboard if the temp gets below about 40.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There will be three consecutive nights in the twenties here. These colonies have come off a hard winter and are not strong. Here's what I'm thinking. Strap them down and move them into my garage, which is heated. My workshop is connected to the garage and there are lots of supers and drawn out frames in there. The bees will be tough to get out of the shop. But I think I'll just lure them out with some honey frames when the weather warms up next week. Also, since their stores are nearly exhausted, they'll be able to feed on the frames in the shop. What do you guys think?
 

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I think you'll be the owner of dead hives. You should be feeding them where they are sitting right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think you'll be the owner of dead hives. You should be feeding them where they are sitting right now.

OK. I moved 'em back out there again. A lot of work. I've got top-feeder pails of non-medicated syrup on them. I guess I'll just hope they have enough sense to cluster up and survive the three cold nights.
 

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I'm in northern NY and am expecting the same chill, though only two nights in the low 20s. I was going to remove the most of the foam insulation from around the hives but I settled for just taking it off over the weekend and then reapplying it late last night. It's not that I think the bees can't cope with temps like these, but having been well insulated for the whole winter, I'm assuming that they have arranged their brood based on what that the insulated space feels like inside and a radical beekeeper-determined change may alter their environment too much if we revert to February temps, even for a few days.

If you need a quick, easy to install and remove, kind of emergency insulation may I recommend wool blankets? I had an outer layer of wool blankets wrapped around my hives after their move in December. The problems that I anticipated with the blankets didn't materialize: mouse nests or damage, holding too much moisture, etc. They worked very well and I could feel the hive-heat they retained when I unpacked them from time to time; The inner layers were much warmer.

Fold the blanket(s) and wrap it loosely around the top, sides, and back and let some hang down iover the front by a few inches, but don't completely cover the front entrance. Keep it on the hive with rope or bungee or ratchet straps. Seems much easier and less disruptive to the hive than moving them around.

Enj.
 

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don't know about the area you guys are in they should have been bringing in pollen and nectar in already i leave mine alone they take care of there self.i installed 2 4# packages and only gave them 1 pint of crystallized honey of course they have barely touched it they been out foraging even had a couple of days of snow and rain.today a nice day get to inspect the installs.
 
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