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I got a call from a friend of a friend today, who said that they have a large swarm in their English Walnut tree.

According to them, the bees are doing the same thing that happened in the tree last year: For the past week or two, the bees will show up, ball up on a 5 inch branch, stay for a few days, leave, and repeat. Says that this is there third visit.

I am extremely new, but reading on this forum, this seems like odd behavior. Ideas?
 

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I have seen more than one swarm land in the same location as an earlier one. I got a call from a construction site a few weeks ago about a swarm. The next morning I was there and removed a nice swarm. A few days later they called me about another swarm in the same exact location but this next swarm was even larger. About five years ago I caught two swarms from the same limb out of a tree as I did a couple of months before. Maybe you can figure out where the swarms are coming from and set up a trap out or multiple trap outs. The mother colony is most likely pretty close to your friend’s house.
Big T
 

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That would make sense - must just be an attractive tree for the bees! I'm going to go up tomorrow and try my hand at capturing the swarm - Lord help me!

They said that currently, there is a about a fifteen inch long, eight inch thick mass of honey bees wrapped around a five inch limb. The limb size sort've negates the chop and carry down method of branch removal. Would it be best to try to sweep them into a full-size deep?

Any advice would be welcome.
 

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It could be that there has been a swarm there a day or two before that no-one noticed, alot of thime when things like this happen the Queen will leave a pheremone "footprint" that really acts as an attractant to other swarming colonies. But, honestly, who knows, there are still (most likely) an unlimited amount of little nuances that we as humans are oblivious of concerning bees, which makes them all the more interesting.
Advice (take all advice with a grain of salt): Be gentle, move slowly, be careful and try to enjoy it, it can be intimidating at first but when you settle in, it's really cool.

Good luck.
 

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I had a place call me up and say they had 2 swarms take up in the wall of a house. I had to cut in 2 places, and removed all comb when I was done. I told the repair guy to make sure he seals up the gap in the siding where they entered so that no other bees would be attracted to the scent of an old colony. He sealed it, but left the warped panel next to it open. Guess who got a call 3 weeks later to go out for a 3rd colony? I know for a fact that I got all the bees the first time, the home owner knows that I got them all too. I was concerned that HOA that paid me would think I didn't get them, but that turned out not to be the case since the home owner told the HOA that the swarm just came in last week and told me they were keeping my number on file for when they get more calls.

Craig
 

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I agree that each of these are seperate swarms. I've experienced this several times with afterswarms from the same hive going to the same location before they find a home.

Set up a hive just below the swarm on a stepladder, truck bed or whatever. Use a piece of cardboard to gently scrape them off & dump them into the hive. After scraping off about 3/4ths of them the rest should follow soon.
 
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