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so one of my hives decided to try to swarm when we had the full nectar flow going on this year. they ended up filling several supers before hand. i eventually pulled the queen with a few frames into a split, and left them to make a new queen. she hatched and i seen her for a few weeks but she never got mated so hive tool test and i put the old queen back in. during this time obviously the bee population dwindled a lot and i guess that along with our rain every day/crazy high humidity the honey in the hive fermented. i pulled all the worst of it out a few weeks ago, extracted it and dumped it into my pond so the bees hopefully couldn't get back to it. tonight i extracted the rest. some frames had no visable fermentation but several had some bubbles. i tested the moisture once i got it all extracted and it's about 17.7%. Obviously the fermentation started way before this and now there are a lot of bees in the hive again they were finally able to dry it properly. It tastes good. I don't notice a sharp aftertaste like i did with the first batch i pulled. i don't want to waste what is left so what are my options. since the moisture content is where it is at should i leave it alone or heat to 160 f to kill the yeast? i've never heated my honey before but i've heard it ruins the flavor. is there any way to get rid of the bubbles that is in it where it is safe to bottle? for the record i don't want to sell this honey as i don't want to ruin my reputation, but i use a lot of honey, and think this would be great for bbq sauces, baking, etc. but i'd like to still use it for the good ole biscuits and pb and honey sammiches since it still has a nice flavor (right now). i've tried researching online what to do but it seems like i'm in the minority having a fairly low moisture content but fermented honey. please help!
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Sounds like now might be a good time to learn how to make mead. Sorry that that is not really what you are asking but you know the saying, "when life hands you lemons, make lemonade".
 

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I don't understand how it could ferment so quickly. My experience is different. I do have some frames that are about a year old that I have removed and not extracted that have fermented. Is this honey from a previous year or just a few months old. In terms of bubbles they are rather common for me when I fill bottles from my Dadant holding tanks. I have no problem with17.7% moisture content as I look for below 18%. I do try to get it somewhat lower if possible. JW has a good recommendation as he seems to be a good philosopher.
 

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....i pulled all the worst of it out a few weeks ago, extracted it and dumped it into my pond...... since the moisture content is where it is at should i leave it alone or heat to 160 f to kill the yeast?........ please help!
In my opinion you just wasted lots of honey.
I would freeze it ALL and then think what to do with it without any hasty decisions.
Personally, I would feed back to the bees.
Oh well. Too late.

So you know - yeast is ALWAYS present in any raw honey; keep it that way; no need to kill it as long as the conditions are not favorable for it to grow (too much sugar).
Why ruin the honey by heating?
Keep as-is OR freeze for later use OR leave it up to the bees.
 
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