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For those of you selling your honey "unfiltered" do you strain it to remove large particles and bee body parts? How is this done in a minimal way, so that it can still be honestly labeled unfiltered?

Thanks,
Buzz
 

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Straining and filtering are defined in the new Florida Honey Law. A kitchen strainer works great. It is illegal to filter or alter the flavor, texture or content of honey in Florida. We can strain all day. The screen size has been set by the state and industry for all the law dodgers.
 

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This is the only thing I strain my honey with,
http://www.glorybeefoods.com/gbf/Shop_ProductDetail.cfm?PC=3&PSC=92&P=21857&Product_Name=sieve,%20metal%20double%20honey&Token=167.239.8.176:{ts_2010-06-27_11:14:38}-682388

I don’t have any problem with bee body parts, by making sure all the bees are out of the supers. :) The few strays that refuse to leave find the windows in the honey house.
 

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You can obtain nylon strainer bags (extremely fine mesh) from either Brushy Mountain or Mann Lake. They are the size of a 5 gallon bucket. You put it in the bucket, fill with honey and slowly lift out of the bucket. Recommend that the honey be around 100F when trying to do this or it may take hours.
 

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I use as regular strainer lined with a nylon paint strainer. You can buy these at just about any paint store. They are excellent and are re-usable.
 

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Filtered Honey: Honey processed by filtration to remove extraneous solids and pollen grains.

Raw Honey: Honey as it exists in the beehive or as obtained by extraction, settling or straining without adding heat.

Strained Honey: Honey which has been passed through a mesh material to remove particulate material (pieces of wax, propolis, other defects) without removing pollen.
http://www.honey.com/images/downloads/honeydefs.pdf

I found these definitions from the National Honey Board. In your case, you could label your honey as either "Strained" or "Raw" according to these definitions. If you are not heating the honey before straining you will probably do best to market it as "Raw - Unheated Honey". Straining will retain the larger particles but still allow the pollen grains to pass through with the honey. A layer or two of cheesecloth works great.
 

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I just scoop it off the top after it has settled for a day. Only use that for bulk pails, you never get all of it. If I am bottling it I just use cheesecloth.
 

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In a nutshell, filtering is when honey is heated to a certain temperature, and pumped thru a very fine filter to render it nearly crystal clear. Straining is removing debris, but leaving pollen and other nutrients in the honey. Bee supply houses sell a nylon (or some such) straining cloth, which is washable and reusable. Cheesecloth has been known to shed small fibers which end up in the honey.
Regards,
Steven
 

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I strain my honey because some times I don't use a excluder and I get some larva that needs to be removed.
 

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per a youtube video....

apparently 75cent 5gal paint bucket strainers you can find at your local big box hardware store work well.
 

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What temp is honey safe to heat to for straing it without hurting the honey? I have heard around 135 F ? I know its a long slow job without heating, even thru cheese cloth.
 

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I let the sun heat mine up and no more and then as we extract it, it goes through a screen mesh that came with the extractor. The strainer creates bubbles so i bottle it into quarts for a couple of days, then move it to the pints, 1/2 pints etc. But thats all. The bubbles and things settle on the top and are easily scooped off.
 

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easier than that, got to walmart and look in the kitchen section for grease fryer screens. Used when frying things to cover the pan, but not create condensation. They would work great.
 

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Our tank holds 4 barrels. When it is full, we leave it sit for a few days while we go out in the bees to get more. We usually only tap out 3 barrels because the 2 inch valve tends to pull down a little of the floating wax.

Roland
 
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