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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so i had a dead out..i took the hive apart today cleaned it up cut out the sections with dead brood in them...my guess is starved they ate their way up through the middle and i guess froze/starved in the top corner of the box:(. my dilema is this.. i have two frames of capped honey and others with various amounts in them. should i store these in an un-heated shed or put the hive back together and put it out in the yard till spring?
 

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I vote for putting it all back together and setting back in place.
It might be an attractant for a stray swarm this spring. I imagine your outside temps are such that wax moths should not be a problem and they'll all freeze in the hive outside, especially as you've already gone through and cleaned out any junk. The couple of frames of honey will be a good attractant for any swarms that might be looking for a ready made dwelling this spring.
 

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If they starved there would have been adult bees headfirst in the comb. If you are sure they didn't die from disease, from what I've learned I would do just what they said except, if you can it should be put 10'+ in the air to attract swarms. I would order some lemon grass oil and put a few drops in the hive. You didn't even have to scrape away the dead brood your next bees will clean it out and still have drawn comb. You could use it for a new swarm, or could divide it and put 5 frame nucs on it. Whatever you do they will start off faster. Good luck I'm doing the same thing only I don't have any honey left.
 

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There is not a problem(that I'm aware of) with reusing frames with dead brood from a colony that starved out.
 

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Leaving it in the yard is fine. If you have more hives nearby, you can quickly grab a frame or two of honey if you need it. You may want to bring them inside if you need to do any repairs / repainting of the hive though.
 

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Here I go again. Don't leave it out in he field where it's vulnerable to mice, vandals, mold, robber bees, bears, kids, etc. The comb and feed is actually more valuable than the bees themselves. Store it in a cool or cold place. Remove covers and bottoms to vent. Sort and repair over Winter. Put out in Spring for swarms nucs & pkgs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
there def. was adults head first in the cells as well as larvae and young bees, i guess for now i will store inside...buying 2 nucs in spring and have a removal lined up in april i will use to boost my remaining hive if they survive till then.
 

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To add to what Tom G. Laury mentioned. If left unattended my bet is wax moths will find it before a swarm will. And then the comb will be worthless. If you have other hives you could also use the resources to boost a hive in need.
 

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You've got it figured out. As for leaving it out or bringing it in, they are right there is a chance of wax moths. But you are in New York where it is pretty cold. The worst problem is robbing for the honey. If you want to be safe bring it in put it in a garbage bag with paramoth. But you must let it air out 2-3 weeks before using again. Probably what I would do. Sorry it is not simple.
 

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I've had some of these hives over the years. Basically, mine dwindled and the cluster was too small to stay warm enough. I'm sure they were compromised by mites. Some died just two frames from their stores of honey. And in 75% of these dead outs, the mice found a way in even with my mouse guards and entrance reducers in place. Houdini mice!

I vote to bring it all in, clean it up and vacuum out the dead bees. If you leave it, it will be robbed out as soon as the weather is warm enough. I had some dead outs I thought were alive because the bees were coming and going so well. Turns out the hive was dead and being visited by bunch of robbers. I lost the hive and I lost all my honey which could have been given to a split or a newly caught swarm.

In some of my remote yards, I found dead hives in the spring. I was too busy to bring the boxes in to clean up, but by the time I returned on another trip, a swarm had moved in without any prepartory action or clean-up on my part. And these hives were at ground level.

Every option has benefits.

Grant
Jackson, MO
 
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