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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

This is my first season as a bee keeper. I intend to save honey to feed my colonies during winter. I figure the simplest method of doing this is storing the frames with honey in them and to not extract it. To those of you with experience I ask, is there any problem with this in relation to crystallization? The honey will not harden so that the bees cannot get to it?

Thank you for your insight.
 

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In my opinion they can always get granulated honey out just fine. If I only had a few frames with honey to store I would keep them in the freezer.That would work best for honey and nectar filled combs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your swift reply. I estimate about ten frames per hive, so too much for the freezer. The frames should be alright in a cool storage?
 

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I made the mistake of storing some partially capped frames in a garbage bag in my pump house. I didn't even think about the nectar that wasn't cured yet. It all fermented while being stored. The capped portion were fine though
 

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I do not live in Sweden. I am sorry but I know nothing about your climate. You may not have wax moths like us. You need someone from the north to help.I wish I could.
 

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If it where me I would have them keep enough honey on their own hive stored by them. Maybe keep 3 brood chambers on them there always. It is always best to not open their hive in winter. Prepare for fall now. Only take honey above these 3 boxes. I keep two boxes always full for winter in my climate.
 

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I stored two frames today in plastic bags and put them in a wardrobe in a garage storage, they were mostly capped; guess I will cross my fingers. ;)

@Moccasin, that's alright, I am grateful for any help. (Local beekeepers, like most, think I am crazy to consider feeding my bees honey, and thus they are of little help in these efforts.)
 

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That is an interesting idea. However, the hives I keep are not the ones you stack, but the traditional "houses", with two stories of about 18 frames each, where I keep the supers on the second story. Therefore, the space is limited and I figured I had to take frames out in order for the bees to be able to store more nectar? It is an appealing idea though to be able to leave the frames in the hive.
 

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why not just leave them on the hive. where the bees will monitor them for pests, and care for the honey as it should be cared for. if you hit a dearth just feed the girls a bit of syrup. that will keep them from using the honey stores.
 

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I live in Sweden i store My frames stacked in the boxes with newspaper between it is also a good idea to pour some acetic acid in a cup and place on top of the boxes that should keep the moth away, and also watch out for rats and mice
 
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