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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I opened up a couple of my hives today, and while there were plenty of honey stores and I've seen them bringing in pollen, I see no brood at all. It's been Spring-like here around Houston for a month now.

Problem? I didn't look for the queen. Other than no brood, the hive seemed plenty healthy and calm with a brood and two supers.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Timsch, You have a problem. If there is no brood at all you need to figure out why. Can you locate any of your queens? As I mentioned in the other thread, your hives should be brooding like crazy already. Double check the supers. Bees typically turn capped honey into capped brood so you might have overlooked the brood. You may also want to consider ordering a new queen for each hive, and the cutout for that matter. If you find your queens in the meantime you can always make a split with the extra queens and some of the bees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I found brood up in the supers of one of the two. The other hive apparently had the queen leave one way or another. I checked them all for honey stores late enough in the winter (houston winter, aka spring most everywhere else) that I assumed they were fine with spring right around the corner. Perhaps I was wrong. That hive was pretty low on reserves yesterday when I checked.

The remainder of my hives have brood, although they are mainly up in the supers. Other than a queen excluder, how do you keep them laying brood in the brood box?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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In the winter, you don't. You can rotate the boxes to try to get them to move up into the deeps. I just rotated boxes on seven of my hives today. One had started to lay in the super already with a whole deep of unused drawn comb below them.
 
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