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Sad reality. I have a near photographic memory. This is a very bad thing because there are some things in life that are best forgotten... and I can't forget. Those charts highlight one thing. We have had higher temperatures over the last 10 years than at any time since records have been kept.

But back to the Clyde's reports. That is statewide for Alabama. I grew up in NorthEast Alabama in the area that normally gets the coldest average temperatures in the state. I have memories of 8 inches of snow in February 1966 and I remember in the winter of 1973/1974 having a freeze so intense we could skate on a neighbor's pond. Most of all, I tracked when I had weather mild enough for bees to fly and queens to mate. I remember the first time we had 67 degrees on November 5th which is pretty much the lowest temperature queens will normally fly to mate. Now we have queen mating weather just about the entire month of November. For that matter, I could have mated queens most of December 2021.

I envy you the ability.....

to forget.
 
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Sad reality. I have a near photographic memory. This is a very bad thing because there are some things in life that are best forgotten... and I can't forget. Those charts highlight one thing. We have had higher temperatures over the last 10 years than at any time since records have been kept.

But back to the Clyde's reports. That is statewide for Alabama. I grew up in NorthEast Alabama in the area that normally gets the coldest average temperatures in the state. I have memories of 8 inches of snow in February 1966 and I remember in the winter of 1973/1974 having a freeze so intense we could skate on a neighbor's pond. Most of all, I tracked when I had weather mild enough for bees to fly and queens to mate. I remember the first time we had 67 degrees on November 5th which is pretty much the lowest temperature queens will normally fly to mate. Now we have queen mating weather just about the entire month of November. For that matter, I could have mated queens most of December 2021.

I envy you the ability.....

to forget.
I listed a reference is all. You'll have to take it from there.
There is location specific information available as well, search the climatologists site for it.
For fun, you can compare your memory against the empirical data points to see how you size up against it.
Weather for $2000 Alex!
 

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Sunny and 63 degrees today so I decided to check a colony. There were about 3 frames of bees - keep in mind this is Dadant frames so the equivalent of 4 frames in Langstroth deeps. This is a typical size mite resistant colony that overwinters here. Two combs had brood, one was about 8 inches diameter on both sides, the other about 4 inches diameter on both sides. What was unusual was seeing an abundance of newly hatched young bees. Roughly 800 bees were newly hatched based on the brood patches. Stores were in good shape with about 40 pounds in the hive. I would feed if it were less than 30 pounds and may still wind up feeding if they need it in March. The queen is bronze/orange on the back and pale orange/yellow on the underside of her abdomen. She is 6 months old and should give a good accounting in the spring buildup.

I made a few changes in the colony. Four frames were in poor condition with a lot of drone cells. I had 4 good frames from another colony with extras so I swapped out to give this colony an abundance of laying area with relatively few drone cells.

Is this normal for December/January conditions? No, it is not normal to have this much brood so early in the year. If this colony keeps going, I will have to split in late March and may be able to split into 3 colonies. Time will tell.
 

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Sunny and 63 degrees today so I decided to check a colony. There were about 3 frames of bees - keep in mind this is Dadant frames so the equivalent of 4 frames in Langstroth deeps. This is a typical size mite resistant colony that overwinters here. Two combs had brood, one was about 8 inches diameter on both sides, the other about 4 inches diameter on both sides. What was unusual was seeing an abundance of newly hatched young bees. Roughly 800 bees were newly hatched based on the brood patches. Stores were in good shape with about 40 pounds in the hive. I would feed if it were less than 30 pounds and may still wind up feeding if they need it in March. The queen is bronze/orange on the back and pale orange/yellow on the underside of her abdomen. She is 6 months old and should give a good accounting in the spring buildup.

I made a few changes in the colony. Four frames were in poor condition with a lot of drone cells. I had 4 good frames from another colony with extras so I swapped out to give this colony an abundance of laying area with relatively few drone cells.

Is this normal for December/January conditions? No, it is not normal to have this much brood so early in the year. If this colony keeps going, I will have to split in late March and may be able to split into 3 colonies. Time will tell.
good showing for the queen.
Lets hope a cold snap doesn't have them chilled.

GG
 

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You can tell a city slicker that global warming is bogus and he might believe it. It is hard to fool a beekeeper or a farmer. We have to be out in the weather watching what is happening and keeping track of what needs to be done to keep our stock alive. If weather patterns have changed this much in the 53 years that my memory covers, wouldn't it be reasonable to keep an open mind that maybe this is not a normal cycle? Maybe just watch carefully what happens for the next 10 years and see if perhaps the world we accept as normal is changing a lot faster than we thought possible.
I happened upon this older paper on the "nature of climate" and thought it might offer some perspective of the big picture, and potentially ease any anxiety felt when the "weather" throws a curveball.

Eight glacial cycles from an Antarctic ice core.

(Eight glacial cycles from an Antarctic ice core PDF attached.)
 

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Clyde, can you interpret it?

Short version, 8 glacial cycles over the last 740,000 years with today being an inter-glacial period. It specifically states that it does NOT account for human interference. If you read between the lines, it infers that this inter-glacial period would be suggested to have relatively few changes for the next few thousand years barring human interference.

The question is not whether or not the climate has varied widely over the last (insert x number of thousands of years). The question is whether or not human activities are modifying the climate and if so, what will be the effect of those changes. We could also ask a subsidiary question about what caused the previous glacial cycles where variations in earth's orbit and occasional volcanic outbursts are known to be implicated. Snowball earth was a thing at one time where almost the entire earth surface was covered in ice. Tropical earth was a thing at one time when even the north and south pole melted and the entire earth had a hot tropical climate. What happens if all the ice melts? New Orleans is in deep trouble for one thing as it is already below sea level.

I submit that this question deserves a separate thread if you choose to pursue it. I would prefer to discuss beekeeping since climate change is a highly polarizing issue.
 

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Clyde, can you interpret it?

Short version, 8 glacial cycles over the last 740,000 years with today being an inter-glacial period. It specifically states that it does NOT account for human interference. If you read between the lines, it infers that this inter-glacial period would be suggested to have relatively few changes for the next few thousand years barring human interference.

The question is not whether or not the climate has varied widely over the last (insert x number of thousands of years). The question is whether or not human activities are modifying the climate and if so, what will be the effect of those changes. We could also ask a subsidiary question about what caused the previous glacial cycles where variations in earth's orbit and occasional volcanic outbursts are known to be implicated. Snowball earth was a thing at one time where almost the entire earth surface was covered in ice. Tropical earth was a thing at one time when even the north and south pole melted and the entire earth had a hot tropical climate. What happens if all the ice melts? New Orleans is in deep trouble for one thing as it is already below sea level.

I submit that this question deserves a separate thread if you choose to pursue it. I would prefer to discuss beekeeping since climate change is a highly polarizing issue.
Sure I can, pretty good at interpreting core samples, albeit of rock and not ice, so understand their value in piecing together the past to interpret the present. I was hoping you were able to and got something useful from it.
Pretty good paper IMO, gives great perspective on earthly parameters that are difficult to comprehend the scale of.

There seems to be alot of uncertainty about the difference between simple weather aberrations and climatic patterns, so please start another thread.
 

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Clyde, can you interpret it?

Short version, 8 glacial cycles over the last 740,000 years with today being an inter-glacial period. It specifically states that it does NOT account for human interference. If you read between the lines, it infers that this inter-glacial period would be suggested to have relatively few changes for the next few thousand years barring human interference.

The question is not whether or not the climate has varied widely over the last (insert x number of thousands of years). The question is whether or not human activities are modifying the climate and if so, what will be the effect of those changes. We could also ask a subsidiary question about what caused the previous glacial cycles where variations in earth's orbit and occasional volcanic outbursts are known to be implicated. Snowball earth was a thing at one time where almost the entire earth surface was covered in ice. Tropical earth was a thing at one time when even the north and south pole melted and the entire earth had a hot tropical climate. What happens if all the ice melts? New Orleans is in deep trouble for one thing as it is already below sea level.

I submit that this question deserves a separate thread if you choose to pursue it. I would prefer to discuss beekeeping since climate change is a highly polarizing issue.
How this relates to bees is that in the past when change in weather occurred the animals shifted, bees included. Today we do not "migrate" with herds or seasons or with climate changes. So Some swarms will shift south or north, but for the most part we are forcing our bees to stay put and deal with it. So one vector of the "human climate vector" I see is the prevention of anemias shifting to accommodate the climate change, Unlike the last 8 glacial periods.

GG
 

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My bees are flying and bringing in pollen again today with temperature just under 60 degrees and bright sunshine. I wouldn't call it heavy flight, but enough to see several loads of bright orange pollen coming in. We have not yet had a full week this winter that my bees have not been able to fly and forage. Thirty years ago, I did not expect a flight before mid-February. Now there is a weekly flight day.
 
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Discussion Starter · #133 ·
After the recent cold weather, what do the blooms look like?

Certain blooms are incredibly sensitive to warm springs followed by cold snaps.
 

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The Jan 18, 2022 data displayed on the Accumulated Growing Degree Day Anomaly Map by the National Phenology Network is below.
I hope the information proves helpful as one tool for beekeepers in understanding the progression of the "seasons" and is used to dispel some of the hocus pocus so prevalent in weather discussions lately.
It shows the anomaly, or how many more or fewer Growing Degree Days have accumulated this year compared to the 30 year average (1991-2020).
World Ecoregion Map Atlas Biome



From the Network:
DESCRIPTION
Heat accumulation in the spring is commonly used to predict the timing of phenological transitions in plants and animals. This accumulation is typically reported in Growing Degree Days. The USA-NPN is currently generating daily Accumulated Growing Degree Day (AGDD) maps using a January 1 start date and two base temperatures, 32°F and 50°F.
In many plants and animals, phenological transitions – especially those in spring - happen when enough warmth has accumulated. This warmth is often measured using growing degree days (GDDs). Growing degrees days are defined as the number of degrees the average daily temperature exceeds a base temperature, or the temperature below which the organism will remain in dormancy. Growing Degree Days are calculated as:

GDD = ((Tmax + Tmin)/2) - Tbase

If the average temperature for a day is lower than the base temperature, then no Growing Degree Days are counted.

Growing Degrees are accumulated daily, following a specified start date, by adding each day’s total to all previous days’ totals.

PURPOSE
For many plants and animals, there is a specific number of growing degree days that must be accumulated to trigger a change in phenological status such as budburst in plants or egg hatching in insects. These are referred to as growing degree thresholds. If a growing degree threshold for a phenological transition in a particular organism is known, it is possible to assess how soon that transition is likely to be reached, by calculating accumulated growing degree days (AGDDs) over the course of the season."

The map below shows the accumulation of Growing Degree Days since Jan 1 of the current year, using a 32°F base temperature, constructed on 1/18/22.

World Ecoregion Map Biome Atmospheric phenomenon


 

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Discussion Starter · #135 · (Edited)
Hmmm, but the phenology only accounts for the January 2022-Date.

If one were to set the start date of 12/1/21 and end date of 1/19/22 that map would look horrifying.

it's not set at 12/1/21, but 1/1/22, which is misleading, and wrong.

because spring started in December of 2021.
 

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Yesterday bees were foraging for pollen with temps near 60F. Today temps were mid 30's and bees were huddled indoors all day. Tomorrow is forecast with a high of about 38F and low in the upper teens. The forecast for Monday is back into the mid-50's with bright sun. The bees are doing pretty well so far, but based on experience, I will prepare to feed in about 3 weeks, i.e. mid-February.
 
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Discussion Starter · #137 ·
Upper teens after pollen may pretty well kill off whatever is left. Around here we call that a killing frost.
 

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I'm just glad the bees are about 300 miles away from me. It removes all of my worry about what, if anything, I should do. All I can do is wait.
 

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Winter landed here last week and will be here till at least through early February according to long range forcast. It came, it just came late to north Florida.
 

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I'm not seeing anything above 40F highs for the next two weeks. Like to get some feed on the hives and maybe an early OAV shot but am not seeing any cooperation with the weather. Just sent an email for a quote on some pallets of hives-can't wait to spend more money-:unsure:.

Where Global Warming when you need it???
 
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