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Well 4" of snow on the ground going down to the 20"s tonight, January has arrived and will expect more of the same into March. With a warm gulf stream to the south when ever the weather comes from the South West there could be warmer periods but come January and february and into March the wind prevails from the North West and the only thing that could help me is to go South myself. I be a poor subtropical country boy myself and this sort of weather sucks.
 

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I thought I saw the silver maples putting out some flowers on a tree I drove by the other day. Roses with leaves... The ground completely thawed - it was like a mid April day out there.

I am definitely seeing some signs of spring in our warmest climates in the county (zone 5b)

What the hell is going on. That's 3 months early.
Adios amigo.
One time too many Username!
Entertaining for a while.

Reminds me of the Bee Gees song: "I started a joke, which started the whole world crying But I didn't see that the joke was on me,"

 

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Yesterday, the bees from my one hive were focused on our aluminum recycling cans. My MIL drinks a lot of soda and they were in there after sugar water. Today, there is 4" of snow on the hive and 14 degree weather forecast for tonight.
 

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Reality has hit 22F and flurries. Yesterday it was near 60F here and all of my hives were flying-today, tightly clustered inside. Nothing more than upper 30'sF for the next two weeks in the forecast. Glad I got a round of OAV done last weekend-hopefully it'll stay cold for at least a month or so and I can catch up on my woodwork and planning. Happy New Year!
 

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We finally got cold here, as well. 15 or so overnight Sat. and Sunday.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
December in Texas hottest on record in more than 130 years


 

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I had seen a few things on trapping swarms that said powerline easements were like funnels for swarms and the bees follow tree lines along them. But then I had heard that the electromagnetic fields around the line interrupted both birds and bees' natural navigation abilities. i have no idea which is true, but I do see a lot of bees foraging in them.
 

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GG, I was thinking more on the lines of Ian Stepplar, where the bees needed it dark. I guess if I make a outside entrance to the hives the cold air would still enter the hive and keep the bees from flying in cold weather.

My coop is highly insulated and has a plug that is thermostatically controlled and only comes on at the temp I set it to, my husband is an electrician by trade so he set it up. I usually keep it around 40F to conserve power in our cold winters.
I've heard of this before (artificial heating chicken hootches and bee colonies) but don't really understand the logic. Chickens, much like honeybees suffer from cold primarily when they get wet. It isn't the cold, it's the combination.

Our chickens do quite well in an un-heated 10 x10 hootch. The only thing we do before winter is to block the two screened windows with plastic. In over 40 years we've never lost a hen to cold, although sometimes a few may begin molting later than the rest and take up residence in the nesting boxes instead of roosting. LOL, forcing a thorough clean up every day until feathers grow out and begin doing their job. For our own use, I think we could place several (4-6) colonies/Nuc's in with our chickens on a shelf with holes drilled to allow for an exit. Gotta think about this some more....

We have friends in Northern China who swear we coddle our chickens too much in the West (Honeybees too, perhaps?). Their chickens (near wild bantams) reside yearlong in a 3 sided open enclosure that only protects them from prevailing winds, rain and snow. Their winters are very similar to ours in N/W Wisconsin.

I guess my point is;

Chickens are a lot tougher than we think, depending on breed of course. Honeybees too. After all - they continue to survive in spite of our efforts to save, I mean kill them off. :)
 

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when I look for new yards I always look for gas lines and power lines, around here they only mow them every 5 years, tons of honey and no problems
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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I've heard of this before (artificial heating chicken hootches and bee colonies) but don't really understand the logic. Chickens, much like honeybees suffer from cold primarily when they get wet. It isn't the cold, it's the combination.

Our chickens do quite well in an un-heated 10 x10 hootch. The only thing we do before winter is to block the two screened windows with plastic. In over 40 years we've never lost a hen to cold, although sometimes a few may begin molting later than the rest and take up residence in the nesting boxes instead of roosting. LOL, forcing a thorough clean up every day until feathers grow out and begin doing their job. For our own use, I think we could place several (4-6) colonies/Nuc's in with our chickens on a shelf with holes drilled to allow for an exit. Gotta think about this some more....

We have friends in Northern China who swear we coddle our chickens too much in the West (Honeybees too, perhaps?). Their chickens (near wild bantams) reside yearlong in a 3 sided open enclosure that only protects them from prevailing winds, rain and snow. Their winters are very similar to ours in N/W Wisconsin.

I guess my point is;

Chickens are a lot tougher than we think, depending on breed of course. Honeybees too. After all - they continue to survive in spite of our efforts to save, I mean kill them off. :)
in a closed coop the chickens heat the coop a bit and the bees also heat a bit so together they each benefited from the shared heat. the chickens also would interrupt the SHB from burrowing into the soil.
And instead of building 2 shed you can build one.

GG
 

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Why? it's a bee highway full of blackberry/ goldenrod for miles.
I have read the electro magnetic interference can cause orientation and queen return problems.
Ya sure forage there but then fly back somewhere else.

so apparently those bees are not noticeably affected.

GG
 

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I see a BAT HOUSE! (y):)

Looks fairly new, any luck yet? Sorry for the thread jack, need to start a thread for bats down in Coffee Chat.
I put it up in May last Year, no luck yet. I had a guy make it for me.
I have read the electro magnetic interference can cause orientation and queen return problems.
Ya sure forage there but then fly back somewhere else.

so apparently those bees are not noticeably affected.

GG
I raise queens there no problem, only work the bees in a veil, so no problem there either, I read something about them being aggressive under power lines.
 

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Chickens, much like honeybees suffer from cold primarily when they get wet. It isn't the cold, it's the combination.
We did no heat for years, frozen toes, frozen combs and frozen eggs, if you don't pick them within the hour they are cracked and done. -30C and lower for weeks on end is an incredible stress. My dad built this palace years ago when insulation was cheap and it has 1 foot of insulation in the floor, 1 foot or more in the ceiling and 6 inches in the walls. Not to mention an insulated shuttered window that stays closed when the temps. dip. We sell fertilized eggs from heritage breeds and people in warmer provinces like to have them when they get spring, not when we do. LOL.
 

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We are on a roller coaster. Monday we had 2 inches of snow. Today the bees were back foraging for pollen. Tomorrow predicted 2 more inches of snow and slush along with temperatures below 35F (2C).
 
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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
when I look for new yards I always look for gas lines and power lines, around here they only mow them every 5 years, tons of honey and no problems

Theres a big nuclear power station and a ginormous right of way, it's got to be a mile across. Some day, that nuclear power plant is going to melt down and fry the entire valley.

but until then, I don't think they mow it more than once every 5 years, and it's all goldenrod and wildflowers. Some lucky guy's got a house right near it with like 20 hives.
 
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