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Discussion Starter #1
Morning. I am in central NJ, and statewide we are dealing with a pretty serious infestation of spotted lantern flies. In case you don't know, they are an invasive species that migrated from China that kills many tree species. We have been asked to treat/kill them when seen. I have multiple nests on my farm, not just a few random bugs, I'm talking groups of 100's. Way too many to squash one by one. We have tried several passive methods, vinegar, dish soap, etc, with miserable results. Virtually all the ag board suggested pesticides are absolutely horrible for bees. One of the nests is about 50 feet from my hives. In general, on our farm, while we are not certified organic I use pesticides and herbicides VERY sparingly.

Any suggestions? Anyone else dealing with these SLF's??

Alan
 

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I have absolutely zero knowledge of these bugs - but have you thought about using a flame-thrower ? Not the military type I hasten to add, but a much lower-powered agricultural version. If you Google "weed flamer" or "weed burner" there are pictures of all sorts and styles, from tractor-mounted to hand-held.

For your application, I guess it's a question of weighing up any collateral damage against the damage these bugs would cause anyway ... Perhaps if you were to operate two-handed - with one person wielding a flame-gun, and another following behind with a knapsack sprayer filled with water to extinguish any persistent flames ?
LJ
 

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Alan;
Get a hold of the appropriate Division at NJDEP-if you have that many nests of the Lantern Fly, they're going to be very interested. If you want, I'll ask me wife (she's an engineer at NJDEP on the construction side) to get a direct contact for you. This is a very big deal and needs to be addressed. I believe that the NJDEP and Dept. of Ag have web pages links on their websites for you to get a timely response and guidance. I'm in the northeast corner of Mercer County and am not sure if your Somerset or Middlesex but reporting this and getting their help is important!!! Mercer County is in quarantine for these pests, not sure if your county is or not. I'll PM a contact as soon as I can talk with her.
For the rest of our Bee-buddies here-these are an extremely destructive invasive species that destroy hardwood trees. They apparently came in through the Port of Philadelphia on wood packing crates and are spreading outward in all directions. They are definitely kill and destroy-more good stuff from China!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Neighbors who have them and I have tried to contact the state and county Ag and DEP departments. On social media there are all sorts of "report your sightings here" type links. But they don't seem to do anything. Nobody I know has gotten any response from anyone other than "yeah, we know you have them, they are everywhere". They suggest pretty heavy duty pesticides which in some cases seem ineffective. Yes we are in quarantine, but very honestly nobody is doing anything about that either.
 

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If you can, burn the nest with a propane torch or something like that. I'd avoid the pesticides myself but as you know, I'm on a lot less land at the house. I'm going to run over to Hopewell later today to check my farm over there-and bring a torch.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
When they lay flat on a tree they look like this first picture. bug 1.jpg


When they fly they look like the second picture. bug 2.jpg

They apparently prey on many trees, but on my farm they seem to like American Black Walnuts and Silver Maples. Where there are one there are more. If you see one, there is likely a nest of hundreds nearby. I have seen them stacked on a single tree trunk by the hundreds.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I appreciate the idea of the torch, but I am not sure that's gonna work. They are fast to react, and as soon as a spray stream hits the first one they scatter, but I am not sure what else to do. Also, I have them in one case in a pretty dense wooded area. I'm not sure I want a flame thrower in there.
 

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Outside of notifying the authorities, there is nothing else to do.

Clearly, the genie is out of the bottle.
Any measures you take are just "feel good" with near-zero effect on any significant scale.
I suppose it makes sense to save your personally important specimens - that much you can do.
I would do so as well.
I would try systemic insecticides that you pour around the tree and the tree takes it in (if the tree is not a significant pollen/nectar source, I'd consider it safe to do). State of PA has good recommendations - I just googled.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nests look like this nest pic.jpg

Agree, 100%, the cat is out of the bag. I get the feeling there is little that can be done at this point.
 

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Outside of notifying the authorities, there is nothing else to do.

Clearly, the genie is out of the bottle.
Any measures you take are just "feel good" with near-zero effect on any significant scale.
I suppose it makes sense to save your personally important specimens - that much you can do.
I would do so as well.
I would try systemic insecticides that you pour around the tree and the tree takes it in (if the tree is not a significant pollen/nectar source, I'd consider it safe to do). State of PA has good recommendations - I just googled.
The genie is out of the bottle so nothing to do OR follow the instructions on how to attempt control?
Which?
 

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Nests look like this View attachment 58275

Agree, 100%, the cat is out of the bag. I get the feeling there is little that can be done at this point.
For those nearby states that are not yet infested they really might appreciate some attempt to limit the proliferation of these bugs.
NY Dept. of Ag (and ECO) has set SLF traps in various places to monitor and have been educating residents re what to look for, how to ID, self inspection of vehicles, equipment and shipments from infected states, how to report etc. for quite some time now.
Ag interests are particularly concerned, among others.

Thank you for any attempt you make to mitigate.
 

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The genie is out of the bottle so nothing to do OR follow the instructions on how to attempt control?
Which?
The genie is out of the bottle
#1)
Any measures you take are just "feel good" with near-zero effect on any significant scale
follow the instructions on how to attempt control
#2)
I suppose it makes sense to save your personally important specimens - that much you can do.
I was plenty clear and unambiguous.
Clearly, my favorite maple tree on the front yard does not amount to any significant scale (but I can save it and will try to do so).
Hope this helps.
 

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Dear GregV,
It is of no help , when ignorant on a topic is it so hard to refrain from commenting?
You google SLF earlier today and feel entitled to make baseless claims?
The danger to the maple tree in your front yard! "Feel good", zero effect, significant scale!
Please.
 

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It is of no help , when ignorant on a topic is it so hard to refrain from commenting?
You google SLF earlier today and feel entitled to make baseless claims?
The danger to the maple tree in your front yard! "Feel good", zero effect, significant scale!
Please.
IF 5 specimen trees are the same as 5-10 acres of some farm forest, in your opinion - then whatever.
Feel free to ignore me.
Please do.
Burn it all down, for all I care - that will work very well.
:)
 

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The feature unfortunately does not block in ispy or when browsing off line so prolific "contributors" show up in nearly every thread making it impossible to avoid them.
Don't ask how I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
For the record I will continue to do what I can to get rid of them from my property. I just don't want to spray gallons of pesticides, especially when in some cases their effectiveness is questionable. Thanks to any who have ideas on how to mitigate this infestation. I asked on this site to get some guidance from those who keep bees.
 

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Good to hear.
I have wondered if a strain of BT (Bacillus thuringiensis) would be effective but have not gotten the chance to research it. I've asked though and have been told fungi has been studied and shows promise. A wasp is being studied too. Neither a solution for now.
They prefer Ailanthus trees so maybe cut them all down! They are a non native invasive with questionable value and they are everywhere, so eliminate the host tree.

A pretty darn bug with the potential to wreak havoc.
Good luck and I'd be interested to hear how you proceed, for better or worse.
 
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