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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I started with one hive and did splits, how long untill
inbred?
Would local wild bees, and another apiairy within a
few miles be enough for genetic diversity?

Or should queens be introduced from somewhere else?
 

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Oh my gosh! Don't do it! In just 3 splits it's very likely that the offspring workers/drones will be moronic imbeciles with a sperm count of one, very little directional ability and the dubious trait of turning honey into sugar syrup. :lookout:
 

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Bees are smart enough not to mate within the family. Buying queens will give the new starts a 4 week head start (3 weeks to emerge and 1 plus to mate). That is a lot of attrition just to let them make their own queens, if there are viable eggs/larvae. Splurge and spend the 15 to 20 dollars.
 

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Bees are smart enough not to mate within the family.
Really? Where did you read that? Is there some sort of mechanism that keeps a drone from the colony that the virgin queen issued from from mating w/ her. Do they recognize each other and say "Whoa, can't go there."?

THere was something said at the ABF conference in FL about DCAs being at a distance that queens would fly to, from an apiary, but drones wouldn't. But I don't recall exactly what was said or who said it. It was in a set of "Queen" talks monitered by Larry Conner. Maybe that is what you are refering to. ?
 

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I forget which speaker it was too. I attended every session I could that week. maarec.cas.psu.edu/bkcd/hbbiology/breeding_genetics.htm discusses the effects of inbreeding, diploid offspring destroyed before emergence, spotty brood, and similar genetic depression. It is not that drones will not mate with their sister or mother. Intentional inbreeding has been tried several times with artificial insemination. Cale, Laidlaw and Dzierzon have some research papers on the subject.
 

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"bad queens"
If by bad queens you mean genetically inferior, but well mated, then I would not expect them to replace her. But if, by bad queens, you mean a queen not well mated w/, then yes, she will get superseded.

What beekeepers see as inferior the bees themselves may not.

What is a bad queen, by your definition? What are you looking to avoid?
 

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I forget which speaker it was too. I attended every session I could that week. maarec.cas.psu.edu/bkcd/hbbiology/QUOTE]

THen in alkl likeleyhood you heard something I didn't, because i can't stay awake through that many lectures. In other words, you got more out of it than I. Great set of programs though, weren't they? R U going to Texas?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If by bad queens you mean genetically inferior, but well mated, then I would not expect them to replace her. But if, by bad queens, you mean a queen not well mated w/, then yes, she will get superseded.

What beekeepers see as inferior the bees themselves may not.

What is a bad queen, by your definition? What are you looking to avoid?
Im not shure, I've just seen "bad queens" several times
and was referencing people in other threads.
I think small, and mabey bad layers?

I'm a newbe here, only had bees 3 years
 
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