Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of splitting a hive, I would like to use the frames from the hive I lost over the winter, but they look a little weird. Here are the pics of it, are they ok to use or is there something wrong with them? It looks like 2 holes in 2 of the brood in the one pic also. I put them in the freezer this morning (Thursday), I was wanting to put them in the new hive with the bees this Saturday if they're ok to use.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,135 Posts
Whats in the white cells in picture 1 ?
Mold is not a problem but what killed the hive. If there was brood when it died I would be very concerned. That is unless I saw them sticking to brood and freezing to death.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't know, I'm still pretty new to this. I'm in North East Ohio, in January we had a warm day and there were a lot of bees flying in and out of the hive, but when I opened it the end of March there were no alive bees and only a few hundred dead on the bottom cardboard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
I can't tell from the pitures what I am seeing. But do you see any dead brood in there? Or are they just packed full of pollen or bee bread.

Do this, google the following three things and look at the pictures, See if you see anything that looks like the telltale signs in the pictures.

"American Foul Brood"
"European Foul Brood"
"Sack Brood"

You should be able to recognize these at least. These are the things you should be looking for on your inspections on the brood frames. There are others, but these would keep me from passing the comb to another colony. If AFB is present, I wouldn't even reuse the wooden-ware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,135 Posts
Uncap some of those cells and see what is inside. don't use your regular hive tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,433 Posts
Look for a black "scale" in the bottom of those capped but perforated brood cells. If it's hard and impossible to remove, or soft and gummy and will pull out into a string over an inch long when you put a matchstick or toothpick in there (and smells foul) it is highly likely you have American foul brood, and you need to call your state bee inspector -- he or she will make a determination, and if it is foul brood I would promptly burn the hive. Woodenware is cheap compared to losing bees.

It's not likely to be European foul brood, in that case the larvae die before being capped and the resultant sludge makes a sticky leathery but removable scale in the cell. When I have that in my hives, I find scales the bees have cleaned out on the bottom board. EFB will usually go away when the weather improves, it's a problem in cold wet springs here.

If there are mature bees that didn't emerge in those perforated cells, likely the hive froze out before they emerged and the comb is fine.

The other stuff is pollen -- sometimes when there is a lot of fungicide in the pollen it won't ferment properly, and the bees will cap it off. If the hive froze out or died from mite problems, the pollen is fine.



At any rate, I would certainly NOT use that comb until I was sure of what I had.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top