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Discussion Starter #1
I have read about splitting hives for swarm control. This seems to be a great method to reduce swarming.

Only one problem i dont have another hive and I really dont have enough room in my back yard for yet another hive.

I thought about reducing the amount of bees in the hive like a split but did not know what to do with the extra bees. I did not want to destroy them. Is there any thoughts on this ?
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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You can do a split for swarm control and them combine them back. I don't know what equipment you have or are willing to buy, but the split could be as small as a nuc or as large as half of the existing hive. I prefer to split it in half. That's what the bees usually do. Then after they settle down you can combine them again. You can combine two successful hives into one large hive anytime. Just pick the queen you want to keep and kill the other one. Use the newspaper method to get them together, then sort out the supers and the brood chambers so the brood is on the bottom and the supers are on the top.
 

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If you want swarm control but don't want another hive, here are some options.

Do a split and sell a nuc. Take 5 frames and replace with new foundation. Great way to rotate new comb into the hive.

Take honey frames from the sides of the hives and rotate empty frames to the center. Expanding brood and opening up the area helps swarm prevention on the short-term but may explode populations in the long run. You have to stay on top of it.

Go in no longer than 10 day intervals and inspect for queen cells. Options for this can be detailed with isolating queen, destroying cells, etc, but a good book on methods is the best bet for reference.

You can always keep as many honey supers on as needed with bottom supering the best.

Except the fact that sometimes your fighting mother nature and it can occur no matter what you do. It does mean that your bees are healthy and your doing something right.
 

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If you only really want so many bees, maybe you should let them swarm now and then.
It cuts down on the population. Of course it also hurts production, but if you only have one hive you probably aren't selling much and have more than you can eat.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I plan on having two hives only and maybe a Top bar hive.

Beekeeping is just a hobby for me at this stage Honey production is a bonus and i give half of it away to friends.

I read about this splitting method for swarm control somewere but cant remeber where or whats it called. Is there a name for this method Micheal.

PS thats good advise thanks all
 

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>I plan on having two hives only and maybe a Top bar hive.

Two is a good minimal number, because you have resourced when you get in a jam. You can get brood etc from the one that's doing well to help the one that isn't.

>I read about this splitting method for swarm control somewere but cant remeber where or whats it called. Is there a name for this method Micheal.

Maybe you mean a Demaree?

I't not exactly a split. You end up with only one hive, but it rearranges things for a while to discorage them. I have never tried it but it sounds like a lot of work.

demaree: http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/000293.html
Look for post on December 20, 2002 10:38 PM
 
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