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Discussion Starter #1
I believe I read that if you split a hive you should locate the new hive at least a mile or so away so the bees don't all return to the original hive. I only have a 5 acre field where I keep my bees, so the new hive would be in the same local area as the original hive. If the situation occurs that a split is warranted, should I decide not to split or try it anyway? Any suggestions?
 

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Split them and face the hive in the opposite direction from the original hive. (if you can put a little distance between them it's better) Intro the queen and screen them in for a day. The second day remove the screen but put something in front of the hive (like a branch or a extra hive top) that will cause them to have to re-orient to the hive. You may lose a few but the majority should be ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the tip! I have just the spot for them! When you say screen them in for a day - how do I do that? I am really new at this.
 

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http://www.bushfarms.com/beessplits.htm

There are many ways to minimize drift or up the number of bees to account for drift. Facing both at the old location is one. Shaking extra bees into the new location is another. I've never put a split anywhere other than at the nearest convenient location, usually right next to the old hive.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Being able to split them up in the same vicinity is good news. Excuse my ignorance, but When you say "facing both at the old location is one"...do you mean have the two hives facing one another???
 

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If you put two bottom boards at right angles to the old hive facing it and then deal out the boxes and frames to the two new bottom boards, when you are done you have two hives, neither of which are where the old hive was, both of which are facing the location where the old hive was. The returning bees go back to the old location and see two hives nearby, but not in the old location and the bees tend to evenly distribute themselves. Granted the queenright hive gets a few more than the queenless side, but you can switch places in a couple of weeks or less to even things out.
 
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