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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On 4-1 I went deep into my hives and reversed them.Yesterday I split the really strong hive and put a hybrid Russian queen in the split, leaving the old strong queen in the original. The other hive had less bees and there wasn't hardly any brood and no eggs, with some swarm cells present. Very puzzling? I removed the swarm cells, pinched the old queen and put a Russian hybrid Queen in this hive. Both hives had an abundance of uncapped nectar. The hive that I split had an abundance of pollen also. I am going to offer 2-1 sugar water to both on top but I don't think they will take much from the amount of nectar in the hives. Sometime around the first of may I will requeen with pure Russian queens. Will they accept the pure Russians better because they have already had Russian queens in the hives? Is there a chance that the weak hive might have enough bees by then to do a split?
 

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maybe they were going to supercead her or they could have swarmed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is my best guess also that they were supercedure cells instead of swarm cells. She was a new queen in a package bought new last spring. Didn't last long did she? I think from now on I am going to requeen every spring anyway. How many beeks do this?
 

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I'm not aware of reading any information that Russian queens were less likely to be accepted within a hive than Russian Hybrids (or any other genetics, for that matter). Can you point to any information that leads you to that conclusion?

How many beeks do this?
I know quite a few. Mostly the "nervous" type.
 

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A lot of guys requeen later in the season, they get a better bred queen, & a break in the varroa cycle before fall buildup.

Sounds like a good idea.
 
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