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I split 2 of my strongest hives about a week ago, wheni did i took four frames out and replaced them with wax foundation and have been feeding them for the past week. My question is that here there is a good pollen and nectur flow right now should I stop feeding and put a super on or what?
 

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Hi Alex,

Usually when you add foundation you also feed syrup. That's to help them draw out the foundation. If you have a good flow on it may not be necessary, but it can't hurt. Let the bees tell you. if they take the feed and build up the comb then great! keep feeding. If they are more interested in the nectar flow and ignore your syrup... then don't.

But don't feed and put a super on the same time. Otherwise you might end up with honey made out of sugar water. :no:

Luc
 

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Usually when you add foundation you also feed syrup.
Luc
I'd debate that - it seems some folks on here like to feed all year. If they needed the split, there is nectar and pollen, they'll feed themselves. Mix the foundation every other frame with drawn comb to encourage them to not get creative with comb design - if you know what I mean.:D
 

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I'd debate that - it seems some folks on here like to feed all year. If they needed the split, there is nectar and pollen, they'll feed themselves. Mix the foundation every other frame with drawn comb to encourage them to not get creative with comb design - if you know what I mean.:D
"They'll feed themselves..." true. But if they take the syrup too, then they'll build that much faster won't they?
 

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I split 2 of my strongest hives about a week ago, wheni did i took four frames out and replaced them with wax foundation and have been feeding them for the past week. My question is that here there is a good pollen and nectur flow right now should I stop feeding and put a super on or what?
I'll assume (forgive me if I'm wrong, but go with the illustration) that you're running two deep boxes for your brood nest. You split by removing four frames of bees from the parent hive, and set them up as a new hive. You then put four frames of foundation in the parent hive. You should feed until those frames are drawn out, then remove the feed and super as needed.

In the new hive, you have four frames of bees, and 6 frames of foundation. In a single story hive. If they're raising a queen, you need to feed syrup and pollen supplement. If you installed a queen, same thing. And keep feeding them until you get the colony built up into two deep brood boxes. Since you gave foundation to the parent hive, I'm assuming you're giving the new hives foundation as well.

Yes, they can "feed themselves" and develop, but if you want to guarantee they'll be built up and strong enough by next fall, keep feeding them as long as they'll take it, to build up into two stories. When they've built up, then pull the feeder and add your extracting supers.

Now, you don't have to feed, it all depends on how quickly you want them strong. By feeding until they're built up, you know they'll be ready for winter. Plus you just might get some surplus honey out of them. But be sure to remove the feeder before you start adding supers above the brood nest.
Regards,
Steven
 

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I do exactly what Steven G does with my splits, except I put the old queen into the (new hive) split and let the (old hive) raise a new queen.
I do this because the old hive will usually be the stronger of the 2 and the old queen will get the new hive up and running faster with egg laying immediately! :D
Just my 2 cents, for what it is worth? :thumbsup:
I am sure not much, at least that is what my wife tells me!:lpf:
 
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