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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m going to do aprrox 10 splits in April. I am going to only take the minimum from the donor colonies. Minimum being a frame of brood with nurse bees and a frame of honey/pollen. I’ve got drawn out comb to add so they don’t have to waste much of their resources to build comb right off the bat.

My question is should I build 10 nucs and put them in that until they expand to working 5 frames or go ahead and put them in 10 frame equipment?
 

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I like to fill up about 1/2 the space with bees. If you are making them up 3 combs or less I would go with a 5 comb nuc box. 4 and especially 5 combers work just fine in a single. 1 Frame isnt much of a hit for a big hive in the spring. It might take more than that to keep them from swarming. This is, of course, assuming that there actually is a spring in Texas this year. :)
 

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My question is should I build 10 nucs and put them in that until they expand to working 5 frames or go ahead and put them in 10 frame equipment?
In April, I do my 3-4 frame splits directly on 10 frame equipment. With a good laying queen, some brood, syrup and pollen substitute they do just fine and are strong enough to be split again late June - early July.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1 Frame isnt much of a hit for a big hive in the spring. It might take more than that to keep them from swarming. This is, of course, assuming that there actually is a spring in Texas this year. :)
That's a good point. I probably can and will take more resources now I think about that.

btw. it's sleeting here today and we are in complete lock down. :D
 

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I know that many people do do 2 frame spits for mating nucs, but I would recommend 3 frames in your 5 frame nucs, 2 of brood and one of stores. The nuc will lose population by the time the queen is laying, and bees cluster better between 3 frames much better than between 2 frames. And yes, I'd put them in 5 frame nucs and let them fill that before transferring them to 10 frame boxes.

Questions, are you going to purchase queens for these splits? if so, two frames would have a better chance of making it for you, but 3 frame splits are still better. Are you going to raise cells to give them? Are you going to do these as walk away splits and let the nucs raise their own queens from scratch? If doing walk away splits, you might plan on adding a frame of sealed emerging brood once you see eggs from the new queens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey Ray!

These will be bought Queens. I might do one walk away.
 

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sounds like you will be giving the "new" colony enough to work with....but Personally I would run them through a 5 or 6 frame nuc before moving to a ten frame hive.....I am always afraid of giving them too much space. And it seems, my observation (no scientific proof), that the bees do better when a little crowded.
 

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Or you could divide a 10 frame deep in half with a thing divider like Masonite, if thin enough should still be able to put 5 frames on each side.
 

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Or you could divide a 10 frame deep in half with a thing divider like Masonite, if thin enough should still be able to put 5 frames on each side.
Will a frame feeder serve the same purpose as the divider board. My feeders have a 3/8 inch gap on each side and 3/4 in gap on the bottom. I like the idea of giving the bees a smaller area to start out but I do not want the expense of 5 frame nuc boxes. I plan on doing 100 Nucs this spring. I was thinking of starting them with two frames of brood and one of food and an empty comb. Then place the feeder next to all of this and move it as they expand. I realize a Masonite divider would be better but I would like to avoid the expense of 100 of them if the feeders will work. I already have the feeders.
 

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A "true" division board feeder is designed to divide (hence "division") the hive into two parts by blocking access totally from one side to the other. A frame feeder (often misnamed a "division board feeder") allows bees past it.

If you put your bees on one side, a frame feeder in the middle and foundationless frames to fill out the rest of the box (but not a second nuc) this could work since they will build on the frames IF they expand faster than you allowed for but there won't be comb there for the wax moths and hive beetles to take advantage of.
 
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