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Split from spring package

1562 Views 7 Replies 4 Participants Last post by  Thershey
I started again this spring with 2 new packages in April. One is a 3# package that has really taken off with the stores and drawn comb from last winters deadout.
12 days ago I was doing an inspection. The hive had filled 2, 10 frame medium boxes to the brim. I thought either add a new box or make a split. I decided to split. I took 3 frames of brood, eggs and larvae in various stages. All the nurse bees on those frames. 2 Frames of honey and pollen. I also shook a frame of bees in. I then filled the remainder with drawn comb frames.
The capped brood has been hatching and orienting in front of the hive.


How long before looking for queen cells?
Anyone ever tried this?

ANY input would be greatly appreciated.
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Thank you for the reply.
That would be so great!
Should I inspect the new split? Or leave them alone to do their thing?
Not sure what the pros would say but I can relate to what chemguy says about learning via experience. It would probably be good for your experience base to see what's happening in there and to verify that you did in fact have queen cells. That said, today is your pivotal day for hatching, might have been yesterday, could be tomorrow. If possible I would probably wait till
Saturday to minimize the chance of damaging a QC. Because they stick out from the frame a bit, it's very easy to damage a cell pulling the frames. Saturday should put you on the safer side of emergence.

Note: It sounds like you probably have a fair number of bees in the split, virgins are quite a bit smaller and faster than what you are accustomed to looking for in a queen. She will be difficult to spot, if you don't see her, I wouldn't panic. Look closely at the queen cells, it's fascinating, you'll probably see one with a hinged flap open on the bottom, others you'll see a tear or hole on the side where the first virgin out dispatched the other cells.

Best of luck, hope it works out for you.
 

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I doubt it very much, she would have to have hardened and mated within 48 hours of emerging. Is it possible that you moved the original queen when you did the split? I'd probably look at the parent colony to see if there is evidence of a laying queen (eggs & larvae) there. If the original hive has uncapped brood that will confirm you are still OK there.

I think you just need to wait another week or two for the new queen you saw to get mated and start laying. Plug your split date in as the graft date on this calendar, it's proven to be a very reliable timing predictor for me.

http://www.thebeeyard.org/queen-rearing-calendar/
 
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