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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm not sure what to do next:

7-8 days ago I made 2 splits. This is how I did it:

1 - I found the queens, left her with the original hives
2 - Took several frames of brood with eggs and put in a nuc boxes - 4 frames each
3 - For one of the splits (SPLIT A) I moved the original hive (with queen) to a new location - put nuc in original location.
4 - SPLIT B nuc was place next to nuc A
5 - Placed feeder on both nucs (b/c none of the frames had honey, were all brood)

Result: Noticed 2 days later that there were so many bees on SPLIT A, the nuc where all the foragers had returned that at night they had a large mass of them hanging out on the front.

Because of this the next pretty day (would have been about day 5-6) I took full size hive boxes with additional frames with foundation to move both splits out of the nucs. (Mainly I was concerned that the one with all the bees was too full and they'd leave or something, and since I was doing that one anyway I figured I'd go ahead and move the other one also). So, the moves went well. There were a lot of bees in both boxes but significantly more in the box of SPLIT A.

The key issue here is this (refers to SPLIT A): When I had all the frames out and then dumped the rest of the bees into the new big box there were a good number left in the nuc, so I just sat the now empty box to the side so they would leave later. However, yesterday when I went to get the empty boxes, I realized that on the inside wall of the nuc box from SPLIT A were 2-3 queen cells. When I had removed the frames I had seen that there there had been some comb laid down on the side of the box but I just thought it was aberrant comb because of extra space between the wall and the frame... with the bees on it it was hard to see the architecture. Now it makes sense why the bees all wanted to stay in the box after I had shook most of them out.

Now, I figure that after 7-8 days there are likely no more appropriately aged eggs for this split to begin on a new queen. (Is this correct??)

I have also heard that it's not good to be going and poking around in the splits too often.

So, it would seem that to save the split I need to:

1 Get back in SPLIT A and verify that those were the only queen cells. Maybe there was another on one of the frames????? (I do remember seeing a queen cell on a frame but can't recall if it was SPLIT A or B) If so then I should be good right???

2 If no more queen cells, then I need to get into another hive and bring a frame of brood with some fresh eggs to the split.

If I do #2 I think that what I might do is after checking for more queen cells (and not finding any) I would pull a frame that still had brood, knock the bees off, then go to another hive, find a brood frame with eggs (knock the bees off - after making sure the queen was not there) then swap the frames.

OR

#3 What about going to one of the original hives, find the queen and bring her (on a frame) to SPLIT A, then let the original hive be the new split?? Would SPLIT A accept her if I did that??

Can I do this (either way) right away or do I wait a few days???? It's been 2 days since I moved the nucs to the big boxes.

I appreciate the feedback.
 

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Somebody with more experience will have to answer this, but for me it brings up a question.
I have read in various places that the bees won't move eggs, but in this case it seems like they must have done just that. Are there any new ideas about this?
 

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Number 1 or 2 should work. Worst case if one nuc has multiple queen cells one of those could be moved.
Or just combine them and start another one.
 

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If there is no queen cells now there's not going to be. If moving a cell from one nuc to another I would use a queen calendar generator to see what days to move it.
I like the generator at ( The Bee Yard )

Combining I just set them on. I don't use newspaper very often.

I would look as soon as possible so I knew what I was dealing with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ok, checked the hives today... turns out SPLIT A did have a queen cell - ONE - and they didn't much care for me messing with that frame.... just to be sure I was right about which nuc that was, I checked SPLIT B... honestly I wasn't sure ... there looked like there might have been a few different cells that could have been queen cells.. they were much wider and taller than the rest but they were all empty so unless they generated a queen that fast and she's now out and about maybe it was that nuc or they never did the queen thing... any way, there were fewer bees in that split so I figured that they could used some more numbers anyway so I went to another hive and snagged a frame of brood with eggs in it (shook all the bees off before I took it ) and stuck it in SPLIT B... guess I'll give SPLIT B a week and check them again for any signs of a queen or a new queen cell...

sound right????


- probably check the hive the frame of brood came from also just to be sure I didn't mess them up!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update:

Split A has active laying queen... saw eggs and larvae

Split B - no eggs/larvae, but does have a for sure queen cell - still capped as of Friday (3 days ago). There is a small amount of unhatched brood still left and seem to be a fair number of bees... so:

1) When should I check again and expect to see evidence of a laying queen? (I put the frame of brood in 4/10 and the last check was 4/18)

2) Do I need to snag another frame of brood for the hive?

thanks
 

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I always figure 30 days. I often have very young larva at this time but nearly always eggs. Once it was 34 days. So roughly May 10

You can add a frame of brood if you want but once the cell is capped it just needs enough bees to keep it warm.
 
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