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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to get back into brewing and since I do not have a lot of excess honey this year for mead,but free, fresh pressed cider is available,so I thought I would try a cider with honey as the primer.
Anyone have a recipe? Specifically, how much honey to use for carbonation? All the recipes I am finding are for cane sugar. I know the amount is critical to avoid bottle bombs.
Thanks, J
 

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You want to use 6.5 to 8.5 g/L honey for bottling. Cider is usually on the higher end, so I'd recommend 8.5 g/L (~3 volumes of CO2). You'll need to convert that to imperial, as I have no idea what it translates to.

If you have champagne or Belgian-style beer bottles you can carbonate much high; as high as 6 volumes of CO2 (15 g/L). This makes for some super-bubbly stuff that can be a real treat. However ***DO NOT*** do this with regular glass or plastic beer bottles as they cannot support the pressure, and will explode. Bottle bombs are no joke.

B
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you SuiGeneris. I do have both champagne and Belgian bottles for this sparkling Cider (wine technically). Most recipes I have are calling for 50g cane sugar for "super-bubbly", champagne- like amount of bubbles.
I will work on the conversion and commence the experiment as soon as my yeast arrives. Thanks again. Haven't seen you post in a while. I miss your reasoned, science-based responses in the "regular" forums. J
 

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The easiest way is to get a keg system and carbonate that way. I use my home brew kegs for cider too. Ferment the cider to your tasting, dry or sweet. Let it age for a month and then cold crash at 30 degrees for a week to clear it up and allow yeast to settle it out. Transfer to a keg and carbonate to whatever level you want with your co2 tank.
From there you can serve it from the keg or get a counter pressure bottle filler and fill up champagne bottles.
Give away for Christmas gifts but don't forget to stash some away for you too!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Eric. Yes, that would be easier, but what's the fun in that? J
 

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Also, most kegs are not rated for continuous exposure to pressures needed to get a cider to 6+ volumes of CO2 (45PSI or higher), so its probably unsafe to try and get the super-bubbly stuff in a keg.
 
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