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Discussion Starter #1
spacing between frames.
My package supplier told me to make sure to keep the frames all pushed to one side or the other. Not to try to space or evenly space on each side. I was wondering what everyone else does. I have 2 hives 2 weeks old and in both checks, the one no burr comb, the other, both times burr comb in the gap between the side of the box and the 1st frame...

Jerry
 

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The important point is all the frames are slide together, bar to bar No space between frames. I push them all together as tight as possible, squeezing the propolis out, then center the bunch within the box. If you slide a frame all the way to the wall, they will most likely not draw it out and build wacky burr comb connecting to the box. I am very anal about frame spacing or the lack there of, because if you leave a little gap they will fill the void between bars with propolis. Overtime removing and resinstering frames, smashed bees will cause more buildup further seperating the frames. If you let if go to long eventually not all 10 frames will fit and you can only get in 9 before scraping of the propolis. This is for brood area. Alot of newby hives i see this and shake my head, I absolutely hate that and warped comb from non cross-wired wax foundation.

For honey frames initially space them as tight together as possible. Then once they are all partially drawn out, pull out a frame and space evenly within the box. The end bars will not touch. This is so the honey can be easily de-capped. The reason you wait to space, is to avoid wacky burr comb inbetween frames.
 

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spacing between frames.
My package supplier told me to make sure to keep the frames all pushed to one side or the other. Not to try to space or evenly space on each side. I was wondering what everyone else does. I have 2 hives 2 weeks old and in both checks, the one no burr comb, the other, both times burr comb in the gap between the side of the box and the 1st frame...

Jerry
I don't know why your supplier told you that. Your package isn't going to build comb so fast that it will build the outside sides of the outside frames too thick. I would be concerned that they might build comb between the wall and the first frame pushed away from it.

None of which should be a problem if you keep an eye on things.
 

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I believe the rational for pushing the frames all to one side is that you have more room to pull the first one (on the opposite side) and will roll fewer bees that way. I've heard people say they use 9 frames in a 10 frame box that way, since it's much faster to work their hives, and they have hundreds or thousands.

I keep mine centered and pushed together, and if the propolis gets really thick, I will scrape the end bars before putting the frames back. Makes getting that first frame out much easier.

Honey supers, once drawn, can have 9 in a ten frame box, evenly spaced. This will get the bees to drawn them out extra fat, making it easier to uncap the frames for extraction with no loss of honey. Dont' do this with foundation, though -- they will often draw out alternating frames, one super fat and extending under the top bar of the next frame, which will be drawn very shallow or not at all. Very annoying to get those frames out of the box!

Peter
 

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I push all my frames tightly together and center them giving equal amounts of room on each side. Less room for the girls to build burr comb in and they tend to draw the wax on that outer frame larger to hold honey instead from what i have seen thus far.
 

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If you lived in SHB territory as bad as it is here, you would not even debate pushing all your frames to one side. That dead space is perfect for the SHB's to hide out in! I am one million percent for all frames squished together as tight as possible, then the remaining space divided between each side.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
WOW !!!!! I am glad I ask............. My supplier has hives all over so maybe that's why.
Thanks for the replies... I will center them ASAP...
 

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Why don't you go back to your supplier, verify that you understood what you think they said or meant, and find out why they recommended what they did. They could have good reason for what they recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
SQ That is a good point!!!!!!!!!!! I will ask, I know for sure I understood as I bought the hives from him and he physically showed me as he said it... Shove them all to one side or the other....
He has a "honey farm" and I have no clue how many hives but he has employees to help, meaning he not just a backyard keeper..
Again I will ask and post his response....
 

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I wondered about that. How many hives he runs and such. And I assume he is somewhere near where u live. Perhaps it is like someone said before that he recommended doing things that way so it would be easier to remove frames in the future.

The way I was taught to work a hive I was instructed to break the two deeps apart and then to push the frames away from the side closest to where I stood. Breaking the propolis bond between the frames and the wall. Thus making the frames easy to remove w/out hurting anything.

When it comes to new frames of foundation and a package I have almost no experience or advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Here was his response
"We push all the frames to one side because it makes it easier to remove the first frame when checking the hive. The bees seldom build in that large of a space. Yes some beekeepers space them out and yes some center them. It is what works best for you."
 
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