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Space between hives

5009 Views 30 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  Michael Bush
I'm adding a second hive this spring. The first hive is on a few cinder blocks and I like having it a little off the ground. I plan on placing the second hive near the first and would like to put both hives on planks running between cinder block risers, leaving space between the hives to place supers while I inspect, etc. I'm thinking of getting 6 1/2 foot planks so that I can comfortably place a hive near each end leaving a couple of feet in between. Any thoughts on this plan? Is the spacing adequate? Should I worry about drifting or robbing? I've read a little about marking hives with geometric designs or colors. It sounds intriguing but does it really matter?

As always...thanks!
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>But if your not moving hives for migratory needs, why have them slid up against each other?

Because some winters it hits -40 F. Most winters it hits -20 F. I think they are warmer up next to each other. On eight frame hives, this blocks the heat loss on 60% of the outside edges of the hives leaving only 40% of it exposed. I insulate the tops.
 

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I'm not saying they are all touching all the time, all year around. But I don't spend the work to try to separate them in the Spring unless having them together is in my way. Then they often end up somewhere between touching and about 4" apart or so.

I think it's probably a good idea to have some space for mating nucs. However I have trouble finding enough room to do so.
 

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> Nebraska's
record cold temperature, -27 degrees at Vinita NE,
happened back on February 13, 1905.

Actually according to Weather dot com:
http://www.weather.com/outlook/health/allergies/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/68366?from=36hr_bottomnav_allergies

The record low in Lincoln (near here) was -33 F in 1974. The record low in Western Nebraska where I used to live was -41 F in 1989. I had bees there then:
http://www.weather.com/outlook/health/allergies/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/USNE0328?from=36hr_bottomnav_allergies

Maybe you need a more up to date source for your numbers.
 

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Record lows by state:
"Nebraska -47 Feb. 12, 1899 Camp Clarke"
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcstates.htm
http://www.netstate.com/states/geography/ne_geography.htm
http://www.dennydavis.net/poemfiles/travelne.htm

Record low Oshkosh Nebraska in 1989 -47 F
http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0113527.html
http://www.weatherexplained.com/Vol-1/Record-Setting-Weather.html
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0113527.html


"The climate is severely continental throughout Nebraska; a low of -40°F (-40°C) in the winter is not unusual"
http://www.bartleby.com/65/ne/Nebraska.html

Of course the temperature here (out in the country) is almost always several degrees colder than Lincoln because of the thermal effect of the city.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>And thanks for the weather report, Mike
sorry to hear about the very unusual and
abnormal lows, hope they continue to crop
up only every century or so.

Interesting way to avoid admitting you quoted an erroneous number in order to disagree with my statement.

>>"The climate is severely continental throughout Nebraska; a low of -40°F (-40°C) in the winter is not unusual"
http://www.bartleby.com/65/ne/Nebraska.html

It seems to me they are saying precisely what I already said. Even to the exact degree F, and that it is not unusual. -47 F is every century or so. -40 F is not.

BTW I gave you too much credit. I assumed you merely had out of date information. As it turns out the -47 F record (-20 more than your quote) was set six years before the number you quoted and then matched about a century later. You really should get your facts straight before you correct people. As someone who has SEEN the thermometer at more than -40 F while I was IN the state of Nebraska, I actually wasn't making the number up off the top of my head (as you seem to have done, since -27 degrees at Vinita NE has NEVER been the record low in Nebraska) nor was I quoting things that happened a century ago as you now imply.

Why don't you just admit you were wrong? Wouldn't that be simpler?
 

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>Please straighten me out - I was under the impression that it didn't matter much whether it was 20 below or 20 above - that a healthy cluster with adequate resources would be just fine.

Heat loss is heat loss. Minimizing it helps a lot. Especially if they get stuck in one place with subzero temps and brood.

> My understanding that cluster survival problems are usually due to high humidity, disease stress or inadequate size. None of these have anything to do with ajoining or separated hives.

But a few degrees difference in temps can make the difference between being able to move to stores or not.

>I'd appreciate some more discussion on this as it affects how I may set up my new yard this summer.

It's irelevant in the summer. :)
 
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