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A local beekeeper came back from the North American Beekeeping Conference and told of a presentation he saw on soybeans. Apparently there was a study that indicated that the varieties Wayne and Corsay 71 were the best for nectar. Does anyone know how common these varieties are?
 

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The Wayne accession was deposited in GRIN in the 60s.

I went ahead and ordered some for a student project.

You know how I think that soybean pollination is the new frontier.
 

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how much more nectar do these varieties produce over the commonly grown ones? Did they show any numbers in the study?

Sorry Ian, this is a 1/2 bake post on my part. I'm getting this info 2nd hand so I can't give you any specifics. I can email the guy who mentioned this to see if I can get additional info.
 

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Wayne and Corsoy 71 are both old varieites from the 1970's. That is where the 71 comes from in the Corsoy name. My grandfather use to raise these varieties to sell as seed. I have hefted a number os bags of both.

Tom
 

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Wayne and Corsay are 40+ year old genetics and likely no farmers grow them any more except perhaps for a novelty. After 40 more years of plant breeding the nectar yield of soybeans should be nil. There simply is no reason to have the plants wasting valuable energy making nectar at the expense of making more beans. Why would any farmer want his beans to waste energy on valueless nectar? That is the trade off the farmer faces. Real easy choice for him. Plant what gives him the best yield of beans. That is going to be a bean that gives little or no nectar.
 

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I'll don't agree that nectar production by a flowering soybean plant will have a significant metabolic cost on pod development or yield.

I think that the yield will be higher because of the increased seed/pod set caused by pollinators attracted by the nectar.

If soybeans were used for forage, you might be right.

But as long as the sun is shining, and water is available, nectar production shouldn't cause any negative issues with pod development.
 

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Astrobee:

All I had to do was fill out the request form at GRIN for Wayne soybeans. They'll send me 50 seeds for free.

We'll just plant a few on the rooftop garden to see if the Honeybees find them attractive at all.

What's really amusing is that I don't remember the last time I've seen an actual 'soybean'.
 

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I'm feet away from 500+ acres of soybeans with 15 of my hive and I've learned a few things about getting honey from them. I haven't a clue as to what ones are being planted but they sometimes have white flowers, other times purple, other times both, and they are all Round-Up ready. In MO. they've 1) got to be planted by mid to late June with adequate moisture so they are mature enough to create a canopy to cover the soil (holds moisture) and give nectar at the right time. It's got to be in the 2) mid 90's or higher (the hotter the better) while they are in bloom and there must be 3) adequate water (a shower ever week or so) during the bloom and heat spell.

If all those things line up you'd better have your supers ready. It's great tasting and a little darker than clover. If any of the 3 things don't occur you'll get diddle, if any two of them don't occur you get less than diddle. If all 3 don't occur you get diddly-squat. Yes, these are technical terms.
 

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If nectar production resulted in a bigger crop, soybeans would have nectaries the size of a Holsteins udder! There Are No Such Things As A Free Lunch. TANSTAAFL. Sugar produced by photosynthesis can be nectar or fruit.
I'll don't agree that nectar production by a flowering soybean plant will have a significant metabolic cost on pod development or yield.

I think that the yield will be higher because of the increased seed/pod set caused by pollinators attracted by the nectar.

If soybeans were used for forage, you might be right.

But as long as the sun is shining, and water is available, nectar production shouldn't cause any negative issues with pod development.
 

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All I know for sure is that the Brazilians have shown that Honeybee pollinated soybeans have an increased yield in the double digit %-ages.

We do need to look into it ourselves.

Certainly, a beekeeper/farmer (who grows soybeans) would be interested in the potential benefits.

While I'm not a farmer, I do grow plants. It's no big deal to check it out.

Besides, I think that some crops make some truly good looking plants.

Somehow we're conditioned not to think of them as belonging in a pollinator friendly garden.
 

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It looks like Corsoy is the correct name for 'Corsay'. While I've found a Corsoy 79, I haven't found Corsoy 71. It would be best to get more information from the speaker on the accessions involved in nectar soybeans for bees.

Here is some information from GRIN on the accessions Wayne and Corsoy:

PI 548628 - Glycine max - Wayne - Illinois, United States -- rank: 1000 ... Glycine max (L.) Merr. FABACEAE (soya, soya-bean, soybean) 'Wayne' Developed in: Illinois, United States Maintained by the ... backed up at second site. Accession names and identifiers Wayne Idtype: CULTIVAR. L57-2222 Idtype: OTHER. Comment: Prior ... May-1966. Reference: Bernard, R.L.. 1966. Registration of 'Wayne' Soybean. Crop Sci 6(3):305. Comment: CV ... A Gene for General Resistance to Downy Mildew of Soybeans. J Heredity 62:359-362. . Comment: rpm1 allele ...
http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/acchtml.pl?1443564 - 5666 bytes - "

PI 548540 - Glycine max - Corsoy - Iowa, United States -- rank: 1000 ... Glycine max (L.) Merr. FABACEAE (soya, soya-bean, soybean) 'Corsoy' Developed in: Iowa, United States Maintained by the ... backed up at second site. Accession names and identifiers Corsoy Idtype: CULTIVAR. A61-439 Idtype: OTHER. Comment: Prior ... Weber, C.R., W.R. Fehr. 1970. Registration of 'Corsoy' Soybean. Crop Sci 10(6):729. Comment: CV ... A Gene for General Resistance to Downy Mildew of Soybeans. J Heredity 62:359-362. . Comment: rpm1 allele ...
http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/acchtml.pl?1443476 - 5379 bytes -
 
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