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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorghum Molasses, can it be fed to bees?

Has anyone done this?, and how have they used it?

Thanks

Bryn
 

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Bet it can. At least I know they love the pollen. But it seems to me it would be a rather expensive bee feed - at least if you take into consideration the amount of time and energy it takes to produce it. Pour a little on the top of a frame in a hive and watch - they go after it!! Now as far as the nutritional benefits are - I have no idea. They will also go after the squeezings (before cooking it down). It would be interesting to give it a try.
 

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In my best George Bush Sr. voice: "Nope, wouldn't do it. Wouldn't be prudent. A waste of both molasses and bees."
 

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I didn't think bees really cared for sorghum pollen much. I just read something the other day that said they worked it like corn. They'd take the pollen when there may not be much else to choose from and that it wasn't nectar producing. I planted some anyway. I mixed a food plot mix into my buckwheat. My husband thinks I planted the two acres for deer but really I did it mostly for my bees. Hence the 60% buckwheat mixture. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We live close to the Amish, and might be able to get the Molases cheap at the end of the year, otherwise they will just feed it as sweet feed to the pigs and cows.

Bryn
 

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I may be mistaken and am referring to another plant. I am talking about sweet sorghum... I see several of you refer to molasses ( sugar cane). There are several varieties of sorghum... the one that syrup is made from is about 8 ft tall and is cut before the pollen ripens - the pressed to remove it's juice and then cooked to about 1/40th of its volume.... this produces a dark brown syrup - doesn't taste at all like molasses.
 

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HPM,
You misunderstood and missed the in between the lines:D Squeezins, N.C.,shine, yatayatayata. Them backwoods boys made it out of whatever sugars they could. The one I like are the "bread Boys." "I'll take all that old bread and feed to my hogs." Heh Heh Heh yeah right.:D I've heard of bees that feed on "squeezins,,but few ever make it back to the hive. The ones that do,,,,,,the other bees can't understand the dance.;)
Rick
 

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My family made what we always called "sorghum molasses" off and on, for many years in Butler Co. Kentucky. Our molasses makers are now old and nobody is making it now. The cooking process requires a slimy scum to be constantly removed from the top and it is just treated as waste. Bees are all over the sweet mess. I doubt if this amber syrup is what others call "sorghum molasses" but that's what it's commonly called around here. That's what my family called it for many generations.
 

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Rick -
Now I get it... a Moon Shine joke,,, guess I am just to literal. But all joking aside... the "Squeezings" will ferment very fast so I suppose with care and filtering one could easily produce a Sorghum Wine. Sugar content of the raw squeezings only run about 15 Brix... so that is nowhere near 1:1 syrup that might be fed to bees. Anyway - fun to think about on a day to hot to get into the hives.
 

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hp you are correct that sweet sorghum is NOT molasses. Many people call it molasses. Molasses is a sugar cane product of which some of the sugar has been removed. Real molasses is almost black ( black strap ), has a strong flavor, and is not very sweet.
Real sorghum syrup is about the color of motor oil and is VERY sweet.
I grow three kinds, Dale, Topper, and M81. The stalks are 11 feet tall.
 

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Dirtfarmer,
As a young man, 50+ years ago, in Hart County Ky, we made Molasses from sugar cane. The cane grew to about 8-10' tall, had to be cut, bundled, hauled, stipped, and then squeezed by a sorghum mill. Two big rollers that was pulled by a arm with attached to a mule going around and around. The juice ran to a huge sectioned pan that was set over a fire for cooking. It had to be continously skimmed. My Dad was good at making light sorghum-molasses. The lighter, the better quality it was, and was worth more. And yes to keep from being off topic, the noney bees, and yellow jackets loved it. This is what it is known as all over Ky. I think what they may be talking about here is a cane that gets only about 2-3' tall and is used for silage. I hope this makes it clearer than mud at least. The bees weren't getting pollen at this time. They were after nectar. Whadau think?
 

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BRIEFLY : It was NOT sugar cane because it will NOT grow in Ky. It was sorghum planted from seed. Sorghum is NOT molasses, tho it is often called molasses. I grow it.
 

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for the first time in quite a few years there was no Sorghum Festival in hancock county (near me, right on the ohio river). was hoping to be invited back to repeat the "anvil launch" . good times.
 
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